Poster showing a child with one eye glowing white and the other, red. Caption above reads "a white glow in a child's eye could be a sign of cancer". Instructions below describe the PhotoRED technique.

How Do We Achieve Early Diagnosis of Retinoblastoma?

Retinoblastoma specialists agree that early diagnosis of eye cancer is a child’s best hope of survival, retaining some vision or their eye. Yet around the world, thousands of children die, and more than half of children who are cured lose at least one eye. We consider the potential and limitations of six solutions to improve early diagnosis.

The Lincoln Memorial, lit up in gold against a deep blue sky.

Revisit One Rb World and SIOP 2016 (Dublin)

We are looking forward to One Rb World and SIOP 2017 in Washington D.C. this October. Read about the 2016 One Rb World meeting and International Society of Paediatric Oncology World Congress in this blog mini series, originally shared later last year.

Dublin Convention Centre was lit up gold every night during the SIOP World Congress, celebrating the childhood cancer gold ribbon.

Alfred Knudson Memorial Session

A special session at the 2016 World Congress of Paediatric Oncology was hosted in memoriam of Alfred G. Knudson, Jr., MD, PhD, who died in July. Knudson developed his “two-hit hypothesis” after years of observing children with retinoblastoma, and this now forms the backbone of cancer genetics. The session focused on most effective staging for retinoblastoma, identifying and treating high risk children.

SIOP Welcome Signs

SIOP World Congress 2016

The International Society of Paediatric Oncology World Congress promotes a holistic approach to care. Through a unique collaboration of multiple diverse organizations, the program embraces almost every element of childhood cancer care and survivorship. Dublin hosted an inspired SIOP 2016 congress, October 19-22, a global village with a united voice and energy for all children and their families.

One Retinoblastoma World, Dublin 2016 – Part 2

Dublin, Day 2 of One Retinoblastoma World 2016, a global meeting of highly committed retinoblastoma advocates. Focused on best care for everyone, we discussed common sense primary treatment and the pros and cons of eye salvage for child and eye, building effective care in developing countries, innovations for global care, and the pathway to progress for our global community.

Rachel Brennan

One Retinoblastoma World, Dublin 2016 – Part 1

The land of 100,000 welcomes warmly greeted our global childhood eye cancer community in October. Dublin enthusiastically hosted One Retinoblastoma World 2016, before the world congress of the International Society of Paediatric Oncology. A meeting of highly committed doctors, parents, survivors, researchers and advocates from six continents, focused on best care for everyone affected by retinoblastoma.

The image shows a candle wick apparently dancing within the light of the flame and the muted golden glow encircling it, fading into surrounding darkness. The superimposed quote reads: "Children with cancer are like candles in the wind who accept they are in danger of being extinguished by an unexpected gust, and yet, as they flicker and dance through the storm, their brilliance challenges the darkness and dazzles those of us who watch their light."

RAE of Hope – Raising Awareness & Empowerment

There’s a new RAE of Hope in the retinoblastoma world this September as we shine the light on childhood eye cancer. Thomas Reid is a survivor, father of a survivor and a Director of WE C Hope USA. The entire Reid Family dedicates Childhood Cancer Awareness Month to Raising Awareness and Empowerment as they help children, adult survivors and their families share their experience of retinoblastoma and how it has shaped their lives. Watch the RAE of Hope videos and be inspired.

We Mourn the Loss of Dr. Barrett Haik, a Great Rb Physician.

The retinoblastoma world lost a dedicated physician and friend on Friday, July 22nd. Dr Barrett Haik was a highly skilled ophthalmic surgeon, researcher, educator, mentor and fundraiser who cared deeply for the children, adults and families he treated. He led development of the ophthalmic oncology service at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, and supported international outreach that has improved the lives of thousands of children with retinoblastoma across the USA and around the world.

Rati with her new eye during treatment in Canada.

Rati’s Hope-filled Legacy, Ten Years On

Today we celebrate Rati, the beautiful, bright, bubbly butterfly who came so briefly into our lives, changed us all so dramatically and inspired the foundation of WE C Hope. Ultimately, expert care came too late and we could not save her life. Rati had plans of her own though. She taught us to see and hear and understand the needs of families like her own, and she challenged us to do something to help change their experience of retinoblastoma.

Butterfly feeding from a cactus flower

The Cactus and the Butterfly: Advocating Best Care for America’s Children.

In early 2013, treatment was cancelled without warning for several Arizona children receiving care at Children’s Hospital of Los Angeles. No alternative plans were offered for essential life / sight saving therapy. The families approached Daisy’s Eye Cancer Fund for help. Read on to find out how we worked on their behalf to protect the children’s access to high quality on-going care.