Butterfly feeding from a cactus flower

The Cactus and the Butterfly: Advocating Best Care for America’s Children.

In early 2013, treatment was cancelled without warning for several Arizona children receiving care at Children’s Hospital of Los Angeles. No alternative plans were offered for essential life / sight saving therapy. The families approached Daisy’s Eye Cancer Fund for help. Read on to find out how we worked on their behalf to protect the children’s access to high quality on-going care.

Beautiful Rati During Treatment.

In Her Memory…

11 years ago, a new baby girl was born in Botswana. Four short years later, retinoblastoma claimed her life. Her name means love, and today, her legacy continues to build hope for other children around the world.

Poster showing a child with one eye glowing white and the other, red. Caption above reads "a white glow in a child's eye could be a sign of cancer". Instructions below describe the PhotoRED technique.

How Do We Achieve Early Diagnosis of Retinoblastoma?

Retinoblastoma specialists agree that early diagnosis of eye cancer is a child’s best hope of survival, retaining some vision or their eye. Yet around the world, thousands of children die, and more than half of children who are cured lose at least one eye. We consider the potential and limitations of six solutions to improve early diagnosis.

Childhood Cancer Day Awareness Flyer, a partnership of the International Confederation of Childhood Cancer Parent Organisations (ICCCPO) and the International Society of Paediatric Oncology (SIOP).

Are You Child Cancer Aware?

The earlier cancer is diagnosed, the easier it is to treat, often requiring less intense therapy and fewer invasive procedures that have lower cost physically, emotionally and financially. Awareness of childhood cancer is key to achieving early diagnosis, saving lives and limiting the burden of cancer treatment on the child, family and wider society.

Metal Gold Ribbon Lapel Pin.

Going for Gold to Reach Our Goal.

Recently, a number of people have asked why we promote the childhood cancer gold ribbon and not a ribbon uniquely for retinoblastoma. This is a good question – here are our three key reasons…

Rati takes comfort in her special bear during chemotherapy treatment.

I Am a Child, Not a Case!

Children with retinoblastoma are much more than a medical specimen. To achieve complete cure, we must consider them as a whole person, not just an eye or a body to be treated. A single word can completely change our focus.

An overwhelmed mother comforts her child in hospital.

Two Children – Two Very Different Journeys.

Two children. The same affliction. Drastically different outcomes. Yet each story represents the most common reality for children with retinoblastoma in these respective parts of the world.