This image features two pieces of text, above and below an image of a stick family, ranged in order of height from the tall father through mother and various children to the family dog. Above: “When a child is diagnosed with cancer, the whole family is affected.” A gold ribbon sits behind the word “diagnosed”. Below the family: “Please support a local family in your community who has a child battling for their life. Bold for gold! Childhood cancer awareness and hope.”

Talking About Your Child’s Cancer Diagnosis With Family and Friends

Talking about a child’s cancer with family and friends can be deeply cathartic for parents one day, and utterly exhausting the next. Asking for and receiving help can be a minefield too. Morgan Livingstone CCLS explores why this is so, and offers tips and tools to reduce stress, improve coping and boost effective practical support.

Statue of a blind girl sitting on a plinth, leaning against a post in contemplation while reading a book balanced on her knees and one hand.

Father Braille: A Wonderfully Dotty Relationship

For many individuals diagnosed with retinoblastoma, sight-loss means braille is the primary means of reading and writing. In celebration of World Braille Day on Friday January 4th, Rb survivor Ffion Miles introduces us to a very special relationship she has with six tiny dots, and the marvellous adventures they’ve shared together.

Artistic tree in white and gold ribbon on red background, surrounded by snow and tiny and large snowflakes. Below, a wave of opaque white ribbon flows across the image.

Our 2018 Blog Year in Review

The WE C Hope blog has been busy in 2018. We’ve shared 24 posts from 17 authors – parents, survivors, researchers or professionals providing retinoblastoma-related care. Each has brought valuable experience, knowledge and perspective, and we are very thankful to them all. Here is a recap of posts we’ve shared in the past 12 months.

a baby plays with an anaesthetic mask

10 Commonly Confused Retinoblastoma Terms, What They Mean and Why Getting Them Right Matters.

Do you know the difference between a biopsy and pathology, or an RB1 gene deletion and Chromosome 13q deletion? Do you know how a retinoma becomes retinoblastoma or when remission becomes cure? In Part 2 of a mini-series, WE C Hope CEO Abby White explains these and other terms, and why using them correctly is important.

A baby has a squint - the right eye is rutned in towards the nose.

8 Commonly Confused Retinoblastoma Terms, What They Mean and Why Getting Them Right Matters.

Do you know the difference between lazy eye and squint, or an ocular oncologist and a paediatric oncologist? Do you know when extraocular Rb becomes metastatic, or why trilateral Rb is neither of these? In Part 1 of a mini-series, WE C Hope CEO Abby White explains these and other terms, and why using them correctly is important.

Workshop attendees gather for a group photo.

Shaping Retinoblastoma Research Development Through Patient Engagement

Parents and survivors have valuable lived experience that can shape retinoblastoma research to improve health outcomes. Kaitlyn Flegg reviews progress of the innovative Canadian Retinoblastoma Research Advisory Board, where parent and survivor priorities are setting the research agenda.

Destigmatizing Vision Loss Within the Retinoblastoma Community

Vision loss is a major part of the retinoblastoma experience, but rarely discussed in depth within our community. Sassy Outwater-Wright explores the trauma of vision loss, the experience of living with reduced or no sight, and pathways to living well at every age and stage of sight-loss.

Two young girls, one Caucasian, one African, recline together on a blue sofa, smiling.

Challenging the Global Retinoblastoma Burden on World Population Day

July 11, World Population Day, focuses attention on the urgency and importance of population issues. Helen Dimaras Ph.D considers the effect of our expanding global population on the expected numbers of children who will develop eye cancer each year, and the provision of effective care to meet their needs.

A young girl squeals in delight and holds out her hands, palms up, to catch the bubbles blown by a woman just right of the camera frame.

How to Support Sensory Development and Engagement In Babies and Young Children

Babies and young children rely on all their senses for learning and development, communication, comfort and coping. Jocelyn Leworthy, RECE, CIMI explores the role our senses play in daily life and development from our earliest days, and how we can encourage fun sensory stimulation to nourish young lives.

a baby plays with an anaesthetic mask

7 Ways Caregivers Can Support Infant Mental Health during Cancer Care.

Infants experience a wide range of emotions, the depths of which are just beginning to be understood. Morgan Livingstone CCLS discusses how the external environment influences infant mental health, and the varied ways parents and medical professionals can help babies cope and thrive through medical interventions.