Tag Archive for: cancer free

Marissa wears a pistachio green sundress and smiles broadly. The background is a beach scene with blue ocean under a clear sky and people sitting in chairs under deep blue parasols.NYT Pic

Beyond Retinoblastoma: Celebrating Cancer Survivorship; Advocating Lifelong Care

At seventeen months old, Marissa Gonzalez was diagnosed with bilateral retinoblastoma – the first turning point in her lifelong journey with this cancer syndrome.  Today, as President of WE C Hope USA, she celebrates 32 years free from eye cancer, and shares the latest chapter of her cancer survivorship story, with two appeals to all in our community.

A faded portrait of a toddler Marissa and her grandmother, sitting together on outdoor steps.

Living With Vision Loss: Challenges and Changing Perspectives

For many survivors of bilateral retinoblastoma, vision changes throughout life. This may be due to treatment late effects, eye health, or other medical events. World Eye Cancer Hope USA President and founding board member, Marissa D. Gonzalez, recounts her journey with vision loss during two different seasons of life, and her difficult course with acquired blindness as an adult after decades of good sight.

Marissa and her mother are smiling at the camera. Marissa is wearing a black and gold number 6 USC football jersey. Her mom is wearing a cardinal USC shirt. Behind them stands the statue of Tommy Trojan on the USC campus.

A Milestone Anniversary: Celebrating 30 Years Being Cancer Free

For many children and their families, eye cancer diagnosis begins a lifetime journey, with many twists and turns through treatment and long after being declared cancer free. World Eye Cancer Hope USA President Marissa D. Gonzalez reflects on three decades being cancer free from retinoblastoma, the journey of a cancer survivor, and the future with her cancerversary fundraiser.

A group of teenagers enjoy a game of volleyball on a sand court surrounded by trees, under a cloud-dusted blue sky.

When Survivors Grow Up: Family Experiences After Retinoblastoma

Retinoblastoma is highly curable, but lifelong impacts are significant for survivors, siblings, parents and extended family. After a particularly painful personal insight, Rb survivor and WE C Hope CEO Abby White asked families and survivors about their own experiences of life beyond childhood eye cancer care.

a baby plays with an anaesthetic mask

10 Commonly Confused Retinoblastoma Terms, What They Mean and Why Getting Them Right Matters.

Do you know the difference between a biopsy and pathology, or an RB1 gene deletion and Chromosome 13q deletion? Do you know how a retinoma becomes retinoblastoma or when remission becomes cure? In Part 2 of a mini-series, WE C Hope CEO Abby White explains these and other terms, and why using them correctly is important.