Tag Archive for: childhood eye cancer

An ethnically diverse group of people sit together around a table, moving puzzle pieces. The photo is taken from above, and only the hands of the participants are visible.

Retinoblastoma Research: Types, Challenges, Opportunities

Retinoblastoma research is vital to understand how this cancer behaves; treatment benefits, side effects, and risks; and impacts throughout life.  Findings help guide medical and supportive care for the child patient, survivor, and family.  Rb Survivor, Abby White explores different types of medical research; their goals, benefits, and limitations; and opportunities to overcome the current challenges.

Two men and a woman sit at a table with computers, smartphones and papers. One man is talking into a handheld mic while the others listen.

You Can Help Change Retinoblastoma Care: Volunteer with WE C Hope

Events that unite our retinoblastoma community are vital for mutual support and collaboration to advance care for children, adult survivors, and families.  They all happen thanks to dedicated volunteers.  In the second of this 2-part post, we explore the many ways volunteers support our work, benefits to both the individual volunteer and community, and how you can help.

Lisa, Marissa, and Kristen smile at the camera. They all wear matching One Retinoblastoma World T-shirts.

Volunteers Change Retinoblastoma Care: Family Days and One Rb World

Retinoblastoma is a rare childhood cancer with unique family and lifelong impacts. Events that bring our community together are vital for mutual support and collaboration to advance care. They happen thanks to dedicated volunteers. In part 1 of this 2-part post, we focus on Family Days and the One Rb World conference, planned and hosted entirely by volunteers.

Two young girls stand together on a large tree stump in a wooded park.

Laughter, Life Lessons and Love Take Root at the Texas Rb Family Weekend

In-person contact with other families and survivors affected by childhood eye cancer is life-changing. On 2-4 December, the Lone Star State shone bright as World Eye Cancer Hope USA welcomed survivors, patients and families from across the state. Marissa D. Gonzalez, bilateral Rb survivor, and President and founding board member of WE C Hope USA, shares highlights from the festive weekend.

Close up image of a single red bauble hanging from the branch of fir tree. The bauble captures various light and shadows, including one point of bright white. The overall impression is similar to the white reflex captured within a red eye reflex in the early stages of retinoblastoma.

10 Ways to Celebrate the Holidays in Hospital

Being in hospital during the Holidays means children and parents cannot join the usual festivities. But you can bring festive spirit and familiar traditions into your hospital space to delight and sustain you all. While cancer has no regard for Christmas, Rb Survivor, Abby White shares 10 ways to support your emotional wellbeing, and your child’s, and welcome festive cheer during a yuletide inpatient admission.

A family gathers around a picnic table for this photo. Some are sitting, some standing, all smiling. Several people are wearing childhood cancer awareness gold ribbons and t-shirts. One girl’s t-shirt reads “I am a fighter; childhood cancer awareness”. The stick part of the letter H in “fighter” is replaced by a gold ribbon. ¬¬¬¬¬¬Across the table, a young child’s t-shirt bears another gold ribbon, and the words “for my sister”. A woman stands behind wearing a t-shirt with a big gold ribbon printed over a repeated series of words in various fonts – the words include “fighter, warrior, brave, believe, courage, hope, love”.

Sun and Smiles Shine at the 5th Annual Southern California Retinoblastoma Family Day

In-person contact with other families and survivors affected by childhood eye cancer is life-changing. On November 5th, World Eye Cancer Hope USA hosted 80 retinoblastoma community members for a picnic party in glorious fall sunshine.  Marissa D. Gonzalez, bilateral Rb survivor, and President and founding board member of WE C Hope USA, shares highlights from the day of sunshine and smiles.

Tall trees reach towards one another in a park, forming a bright golden canopy. Below, a carpet of red and gold leaves covers the ground.

Gratitude, its Benefits, Toxic Positivity, and How to Feel Grateful in Hard Times

Gratitude may be one of the best ways we can support our health and wellbeing. But it’s much more than giving thanks. It isn’t easy when we’re living with cancer and its effects, and used in the wrong way, it can do much harm. In the first of two posts, Rb survivor Abby White explores what gratitude is, what it is not, the benefits, and how we can practice gratitude – even in tough times.

Two hands reach up into the sky and appear to be holding the sun. The sky is a beautiful canvas of pink and purple hues.

The Gratitude Gap and 10 Ways to Practice Gratitude

Gratitude is potent self-care. In part 2 of our Gratitude deep-dive, Rb survivor Abby White explores “the gratitude gap” – a big challenge that’s easy to overcome when we know about it. Plus how this knowledge can help children develop gratitude skills early. And 10 varied ways to practice and strengthen gratitude year-round, during the Holidays, and even in hard times.

A faded portrait of a toddler Marissa and her grandmother, sitting together on outdoor steps.

Living With Vision Loss: Challenges and Changing Perspectives

For many survivors of bilateral retinoblastoma, vision changes throughout life. This may be due to treatment late effects, eye health, or other medical events. World Eye Cancer Hope USA President and founding board member, Marissa D. Gonzalez, recounts her journey with vision loss during two different seasons of life, and her difficult course with acquired blindness as an adult after decades of good sight.

Damian lies on a hospital bed, wearing a blue t-shirt with a red and yellow Team Damian logo that resembles the brand of his hero, Spiderman. He is bald and is smiling at the camera.

Under-Treatment and Over-Treatment of Retinoblastoma

Retinoblastoma care is a complex balancing act.  Some children receive too little treatment, while others receive more than necessary, with potentially devastating results.  Sharing two children’s stories, Rb survivor Abby White explores what under- and over-treatment are, when they may happen, their consequences, and how we can prevent them.