Tag Archive for: eye cancer

A young African boy with short, curly black hair and a big, cheerful smile looks directly at the camera. He's wearing a cosy knitted blue sweater over a white collared shirt, and His right arm is flexed in a gesture of strength. The pupil of his right eye has a prominent pearly glow. Overlaying the wooden fence background, bold white text states "NO CHILD SHOULD DIE FROM UNDETECTED EYE CANCER." Below is a horizontal golden line. In the bottom left corner, the gold "KNOW THE GLOW®" logo is followed by the text "PREVENT CHILDHOOD BLINDNESS" in a smaller font. In the bottom right corner are the Kenyan flag and crests of the government and Kenyatta National Hospital, Nairobi.

Between Shadow and Light: Young Lives in Jeopardy from Retinoblastoma

Worldwide, children and their families grapple with life-threatening eye cancer due to delayed diagnosis and care. Unchecked, retinoblastoma has far-reaching consequences. Through two family stories, WE C Hope CEO Abby White explores the impacts of low awareness, slow referral, and delayed care, and the life-saving, sight-saving opportunities they reveal.

Close up of a smiling, playful young African boy with a shaved head, who appears to be leaning against a tree. He has big, bright, happy eyes, one of which has a creamy glow in the pupil. He is wearing a light blue sweater. Across the blurred background, bold white text reads "HELP IDENTIFY CHILDHOOD EYE CANCER EARLY".

A Glint or a Squint Could Be Your Hint: Knowledge is Key to Retinoblastoma Early Diagnosis

Critical clues to a child’s eye cancer hide in plain sight. Parent and physician knowledge, and ability to spot these silent signs are vital to early detection, swift referral, and prompt diagnosis. Meet five children from around the world whose parents’ curiosity, nagging concern, and action were pivotal to their diagnosis and life-saving, sight-saving care.

Mile High Moments at the Denver Retinoblastoma Family Weekend

Fifty retinoblastoma patients, survivors, and their family members joined World Eye Cancer Hope USA in February for three days of connection and fun in Colorado’s capital. Marissa D. Gonzalez, President and Founding Board Member or WE C Hope USA, shares highlights from the weekend, and why these gatherings are so important to our community.

On a marine-blue background, large bold yellow-gold text reads "WE C Hope". The letter “P” in the word “hope” is formed by a bright gold ribbon – this is the central feature of the entire image. Below, smaller text reads "For every child, survivor, and family living with childhood eye cancer". The website wechope.org is included at the bottom in the smallest text.

Solidarity, Strength, and Synergy: The Gold Ribbon and the Global Fight Against Childhood Cancer

The gold ribbon is the unifying symbol of childhood cancer. Worldwide, it celebrates the victory of each life saved, honours the memory of every precious child lost, and shines with hope of cure for all children. WE C Hope CEO, Abby White, explains four key reasons we support the gold ribbon campaign, and shares new gold ribbon merch designs you can buy to support our retinoblastoma community.

Marissa wears a pistachio green sundress and smiles broadly. The background is a beach scene with blue ocean under a clear sky and people sitting in chairs under deep blue parasols.NYT Pic

Beyond Retinoblastoma: Celebrating Cancer Survivorship; Advocating Lifelong Care

At seventeen months old, Marissa Gonzalez was diagnosed with bilateral retinoblastoma – the first turning point in her lifelong journey with this cancer syndrome.  Today, as President of WE C Hope USA, she celebrates 32 years free from eye cancer, and shares the latest chapter of her cancer survivorship story, with two appeals to all in our community.

Three sets of eyes represent different ethnic groups, each labelled with their respective ethnicity. The “White” eyes show bright red reflex, the “Asian” eyes display a yellowish reflex, and the 'Black' eyes have a creamy-white reflex. These colours are visible in the pupils of the eyes.

The Arclight and Fundal Reflex Test: Shining the Light on Retinoblastoma

Screening children’s eyes with the Fundal “Red” Reflex is key to early detection of retinoblastoma, but until recently, it was difficult to deliver in many countries. Dr Andrew Blaikie, ophthalmologist and clinical lead for the Arclight Project at the University of St Andrews, describes the importance of this simple exam, and how the Arclight improves eye health access and outcomes for children with eye cancer around the world.

Side-by-side photos of two young girls with a text overlay. On the left, a smiling Caucasian girl with wispy light brown hair, wearing a floral dress, holds a bouquet of daisies. She is outdoors, bathed in sunlight. On the right, a smiling African girl with short black hair relaxes on a colourful plaid sofa. She is wearing a pink top with a ruffled neckline, and rests her cheek on her hand. Across the top, in cursive script, text reads "Daisy Gave Rati Hope".

From One Child to One Rb World: Our Foundation Story

Daisy’s Eye Cancer Fund (now World Eye Cancer Hope) evolved from the generosity of one family sharing hope with another at opposite ends of the earth, creating light within the darkness that retinoblastoma brought to their lives. Rb Survivor and Daisy Fund co-founder, Abby White, shares Rati’s story, and how her experience led to our hope-building work today.

A large group of people gather together for a group photo. Some are wearing beaded t-shirts showing the Daisy Fund logo.

From One Child to One Rb World: WE C Hope for Retinoblastoma Care

In the first half of this article, we met Rati and Daisy, two young children with retinoblastoma who inspired the foundation of Daisy’s Eye Cancer Fund in 2004. In part 2, Rb Survivor and Daisy Fund co-founder, Abby White, reflects on what happened after Rati died – our journey to World Eye Cancer Hope (WE C Hope), One Rb World, and advocacy for all children, survivors and families.

A collage of 8 small photos, showing buildings and people doing various activities, all bathed in green, pink, blue or purple light. Along the bottom, a banner reads "RARE DISEASE DAY GLOBAL CHAIN OF LIGHTS" and “hashtag LIGHT UP FOR RARE", written in blue, green and pink. The event logo features handprints in the three colours, overlapping to form a fan around a white silhouette of a person from waist-up, and additional colours where they overlap.

Light Up for Rare and Share Your Retinoblastoma Colours on February 29!

Retinoblastoma is a rare cancer, affecting around 1 in 16,000 live births.  Rarity poses challenges from pre-diagnosis through treatment and lifelong care – Rare Disease Day matters to our community!  Discover how you can glow bright on the evening of February 29 to help form a Global Chain of Light for everyone living with rare childhood eye cancer and its effects.

Two women are seated at a round table in a conference room, directly facing each other as they engage in deep discussion. The woman on the left clasps her hands on her lap and looks highly focused. The woman on the right gesticulates with both hands raised to chest level, palms facing towards the other woman, with her fingers splayed. She appears to be explaining or emphasizing a point, or trying to convey information clearly. A tablet and notepad rest on the table between the two ladies.

Capture the Moment at One Retinoblastoma World 2024 in Hawaii

One Retinoblastoma World is community, conversation and collaboration for the best lifelong Rb care and support.  Previous participants share why the event is so valuable.  Rb survivor and WE C Hope CEO, Abby White, considers the many benefits of participating in person compared to attending online, and some ways we can travel “kuleana” to the conference.