Tag Archive for: ophthalmology

Close-up of a young African boy smiling broadly. He has short hair and wears a blue tank top. The background is blurred with warm, earthy tones. Overlaying text reads: A photo can identify cancer in a child’s eye. Below a horizontal golden line is the gold KNOW THE GLOW® logo and the text PREVENT CHILDHOOD BLINDNESS. In the bottom right corner are the Kenyan flag and crests of the government and Kenyatta National Hospital, Nairobi.

Pearls of Light: The Pathway to Retinoblastoma Early Detection

Early diagnosis of retinoblastoma saves children’s lives, and offers the best opportunity for safe vision saving therapy. But worldwide, many children are diagnosed late. KnowTheGlow founder, Megan Webber, and WE C Hope USA President, Marissa D. Gonzalez discuss how our early detection partnership evolved, and update on the progress we’re making for children in Africa and Asia.

Mile High Moments at the Denver Retinoblastoma Family Weekend

Fifty retinoblastoma patients, survivors, and their family members joined World Eye Cancer Hope USA in February for three days of connection and fun in Colorado’s capital. Marissa D. Gonzalez, President and Founding Board Member or WE C Hope USA, shares highlights from the weekend, and why these gatherings are so important to our community.

Marissa wears a pistachio green sundress and smiles broadly. The background is a beach scene with blue ocean under a clear sky and people sitting in chairs under deep blue parasols.NYT Pic

Beyond Retinoblastoma: Celebrating Cancer Survivorship; Advocating Lifelong Care

At seventeen months old, Marissa Gonzalez was diagnosed with bilateral retinoblastoma – the first turning point in her lifelong journey with this cancer syndrome.  Today, as President of WE C Hope USA, she celebrates 32 years free from eye cancer, and shares the latest chapter of her cancer survivorship story, with two appeals to all in our community.

Close-up of a toddler with blue eyes, one of which has a creamy glow in the pupil. The child’s mouth is slightly open, with a curious or surprised expression. The child wears a pastel lilac jacket. The background is blurred and indistinct, putting the focus on the child's face. Overlaying the background, bold white text states "PREVENT CHILDHOOD BLINDNESS." Below is a thin yellow horizontal line.

Illuminating a Child’s Health: The Power of Glow Awareness and Innovation in Detecting Retinoblastoma

Worldwide, many children with eye cancer are diagnosed late.  Early diagnosis saves lives, and offers the best opportunity for safe vision saving therapy.  Leukocoria awareness advocate, Megan Webber, explores why glow awareness and community eye screening are vital to early detection and referral, and how KnowTheGlow and WE C Hope are helping to ensure children receive timely, effective care.

Retinoblastoma Treatment and Vision – The Double-Edged Sword

When eye cancer is diagnosed early, it may be possible to save a child’s eye or even sight. But tumours and treatments themselves affect vision. Sandra Staffieri, orthoptist and Rb Care Co-ordinator at the Royal Children’s Hospital, Melbourne, reviews how different retinoblastoma therapies can impact the eye, and how parents can support their child.

Text reads “Know the glow | prevent childhood blindness”. KnowTheGlow logo is in the bottom left corner. A latino girl sits in a grassy field. She is wearing denim dungarees and a white shirt, and has two bows in her curly hair. She is smiling ho at the camera and has a white glow in her left eye.

“Have We Spoken Before?” Same Retinoblastoma Diagnosis Story, Different Parents…

Many families tell of delayed pathways to care when their child is diagnosed with eye cancer. Orthoptist and retinoblastoma care coordinator, Sandra Staffieri, and leukocoria awareness advocate, Megan Webber, are frustrated by the repeated stories and their negative patient impacts. They explore why these delays continue, some efforts to overcome the challenges, and where they find hope for the future.

A faded portrait of a toddler Marissa and her grandmother, sitting together on outdoor steps.

Living With Vision Loss: Challenges and Changing Perspectives

For many survivors of bilateral retinoblastoma, vision changes throughout life. This may be due to treatment late effects, eye health, or other medical events. World Eye Cancer Hope USA President and founding board member, Marissa D. Gonzalez, recounts her journey with vision loss during two different seasons of life, and her difficult course with acquired blindness as an adult after decades of good sight.

Damian lies on a hospital bed, wearing a blue t-shirt with a red and yellow Team Damian logo that resembles the brand of his hero, Spiderman. He is bald and is smiling at the camera.

Under-Treatment and Over-Treatment of Retinoblastoma

Retinoblastoma care is a complex balancing act.  Some children receive too little treatment, while others receive more than necessary, with potentially devastating results.  Sharing two children’s stories, Rb survivor Abby White explores what under- and over-treatment are, when they may happen, their consequences, and how we can prevent them.

Fire Poppies – vibrant golden petals and green leaves brighten a scorched landscape.

8 Ways to Heal Survivor Guilt

Anyone affected by retinoblastoma can experience survivor guilt – child and adult survivors, siblings, parents, grandparents, and others. WE C Hope CEO and Rb Survivor Abby White concludes this four-part series on Survivor Guilt with 8 practical suggestions to help acknowledge, move through, and heal from the destructive emotions that fuel survivor guilt.

Understanding Survivor Guilt

Survivor guilt of some kind is an almost universal experience for individuals affected by retinoblastoma – survivors and siblings of all ages, parents, grandparents, and others. Continuing our four-part series on Survivor Guilt, WE C Hope CEO and Rb Survivor Abby White explores the causes, risk factors, and underlying emotions.