Tag Archive for: retinoblastoma research

A collage of 8 small photos, showing buildings and people doing various activities, all bathed in green, pink, blue or purple light. Along the bottom, a banner reads "RARE DISEASE DAY GLOBAL CHAIN OF LIGHTS" and “hashtag LIGHT UP FOR RARE", written in blue, green and pink. The event logo features handprints in the three colours, overlapping to form a fan around a white silhouette of a person from waist-up, and additional colours where they overlap.

Light Up for Rare and Share Your Retinoblastoma Colours on February 29!

Retinoblastoma is a rare cancer, affecting around 1 in 16,000 live births.  Rarity poses challenges from pre-diagnosis through treatment and lifelong care – Rare Disease Day matters to our community!  Discover how you can glow bright on the evening of February 29 to help form a Global Chain of Light for everyone living with rare childhood eye cancer and its effects.

Two women are seated at a round table in a conference room, directly facing each other as they engage in deep discussion. The woman on the left clasps her hands on her lap and looks highly focused. The woman on the right gesticulates with both hands raised to chest level, palms facing towards the other woman, with her fingers splayed. She appears to be explaining or emphasizing a point, or trying to convey information clearly. A tablet and notepad rest on the table between the two ladies.

Capture the Moment at One Retinoblastoma World 2024 in Hawaii

One Retinoblastoma World is community, conversation and collaboration for the best lifelong Rb care and support.  Previous participants share why the event is so valuable.  Rb survivor and WE C Hope CEO, Abby White, considers the many benefits of participating in person compared to attending online, and some ways we can travel “kuleana” to the conference.

Close-up photo of a young toddler with a blue and white pacifier in their mouth, looking directly at the camera. The right side of the child’s face is bathed in light while the left side is in shadow. The pupil of the right eye has a prominent pearly glow. The blurred background emphasizes the child's face. Overlaying the background, bold white text states "An early diagnosis is the best cure." The word “Cure” is emphasised in a flowing gold script.

Early Diagnosis is the Bedrock of Retinoblastoma Care

Despite advances in retinoblastoma treatment, effective care is challenged globally by delayed diagnosis. Early diagnosis saves lives and improves sight-saving options. Rb survivor and WE C Hope CEO, Abby White, explores common reasons for delayed diagnosis, four pillars needed to achieve routine early diagnosis, and how our One Rb World community is united in this goal.

An illustration of a syringe holding medicine. The syringe casts a long shadow in the shape of a dollar symbol.

Investing in Hope: The Quest to Fund Retinoblastoma Research

Research funding is vital to improve retinoblastoma early diagnosis, life and sight-saving treatment, family support, survivor care, and cancer prevention. But securing the funds for rare cancer research is very tough, often demoralising for researchers and clinician-scientists. Three retinoblastoma researchers share their experience, and two organizations helping to drive Rb research forward invite you to help.

A group of people representing diverse ethnic backgrounds are sitting or standing around a table scattered with post-it notes. They are deep in conversation, and several are reaching out to move post-it notes into new positions on the table.

United Against Retinoblastoma: The Importance of Global Data and Collaboration

Understanding how retinoblastoma affects children is critical to improve diagnosis, treatment, support and outcomes for all.  Mattan Arazi, M.D and Ido Didi Fabian, M.D., MPH, world-focused ophthalmologists from Sheba Medical Centre, Israel, explore why global data and collaboration are so important in Rb research, and the knowledge, progress, and hope they are building for families and professional teams worldwide.

The silhouette of a medical caduceus symbol features two snakes winding around a winged staff. A weighing dish hangs from each wing. The scales are in balance.

Unveiling Shadows: Cognitive and Unconscious Bias in Retinoblastoma Research

The human mind can subtly influence scientific research, with potentially serious consequences for patient care and outcomes. Rb survivor and WE C Hope CEO, Abby White, explores the nuanced world of cognitive and unconscious biases in retinoblastoma research, and strategies that can minimize their impact to ensure objective research and the best care possible for all.

A lantern with heart-shaped window casts a large rosy heart glow on a blue painted wooden wall, and a pool of light across the floor where it sits.

Bound by Love, Unbound by Cancer: Retinoblastoma through the Lens of Relationships

Retinoblastoma can have a profound impact on family relationships, during diagnosis and treatment, and throughout life. Linda Conyard MGestT delves into the factors affecting relationships, and the best ways to support families. She also explores attachment theory, and how it can help us understand family dynamics when a child has a risk for, or diagnosis of, childhood eye cancer.

An ethnically diverse group of people sit together around a table, moving puzzle pieces. The photo is taken from above, and only the hands of the participants are visible.

Multicentre Research Collaboration: the Challenge and the Light

Multicentre research is complex.  Challenges can arise in the process of bringing its  many benefits to patients, families and professionals. In part 2/2 of this article, Rb survivor and WE C Hope CEO, Abby White, explores common challenges, with solutions for each, and how our childhood cancer community encourages healthy, successful collaborations.

10 different people’s arms reach inwards to clasp hands at the centre. They represent different races, and their sleeves are brightly coloured.

Multicentre Research Collaborations for Retinoblastoma

Retinoblastoma is a rare cancer, posing major challenges to researchers everywhere. In part 1/2 of this article, Rb survivor and WE C Hope CEO, Abby White, explores the many ways multicentre research collaboration can overcome these challenges and change patient care and outcomes – for the child, survivor, family and professional.

2 people side by side at a wooden table, one working on a laptop the other writing in a notebook. Only their hands are visible.

4 Reasons Survivors and Families May Not Participate in Retinoblastoma Research, and Ways to Improve Engagement.

Survivor participation in retinoblastoma research is key to understanding long-term impacts of the cancer, and improving care. But many barriers to participation exist Len Burns, a blind bilateral Rb survivor and licensed family therapist, considers four major barriers, and opportunities to overcome them.