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Inspired by

Daisy and Rati

Welcome to World Eye Cancer Hope

Retinoblastoma is an aggressive eye cancer affecting babies and young children.  It kills over 7,000 youngsters each year, and blinds many more.

The most common early sign of childhood eye cancer is a white glow in the pupil of the affected eye.  The cancer is easy to diagnose and when found early, treatment is very effective.

Suffering and death is highest in developing countries, where most affected children live and timely access to specialist cancer care is limited.  In developed countries, survival is above 96%, but most children experience moderate to severe vision loss or complete blindness.  Globally, children, families and survivors experience significant emotional trauma.

Inspired by
Daisy & Rati

In Your Country

WE C Hope for all children with eye cancer, their families and survivors.

Baby with one white pupil and one red pupilIncreasing access to specialist care will bring the promise of life and sight to every child, and improved life-long health to survivors. This is our mission. We:

  • Educate the public and medical community about retinoblastoma to achieve early diagnosis and rapid referral to specialist care
  • Empower medical teams to deliver sustainable high quality evidence-based care for affected children and adult survivors.
  • Enable family support programs that reduce practical and emotional burdens and improve access to essential care

Support Kids During Needle Related Procedures


Kenyan Child Life Specialist, Jayne Kamau, distracts a young patient with a meteor shower toy while a nurse inserts an IV in her hand.

Only 5% of children have support for immunization needle pain. Seriously ill children experience many needle related procedures, rarely with adequate pain support. But pain and distress can be managed and reduced.

Visit our Needle Related Procedures guide to find supports for children of all ages.  Parents, ask how to manage your child’s pain. Healthcare providers, please give parents options. Learn how to make needles easier and safer for everyone.

Thank You for Joining the 6th One Rb World Meeting on 1-3 October 2021!


A slide from Sarah’s presentation, titled “Thank You”, with a single photo and the One Rb World 2021 Logo below. In the photo, Sarah sits on a rock structure at the top of a mountain. Her body is facing to the left, her legs outstretched, and her feet resting on a different rock. She is leaning against the rock she is seated on, looking away from the camera at the view. Slivers of blue sky peak through the blanket of clouds, and in the distance, many trees, farms, fields and national parkland can be seen from this high vantage point.

We were delighted to host the 6th One Rb World event on 1-3 October, 2021. Being 100% virtual due to the pandemic, we welcomed Rb specialists, researchers, survivors and families from around the world to a hope-filled rogram.

Planning and hosting is always an adventure, especially with a team working in lockdown conditions across an 18 hour time differnce!  Read on for some behind-the-scenes insight and conference highlights.

Families, Survivors, Specialists: Join an Rb Community Event


7 children co-create a group board game, supported by an adult. One of the children is adding to the board game with a marker

WE C Hope hosts events for our global Rb community, from virtual child life activity sessions and relaxing family days, to major collaboratve meetings that unite us all to share knowledge and move care forward together.

Read about our upcoming events, find programs and event preparation resources, and register. Please join us to connect with others who share your experience and desire that all children, survivors and families have the best care possible.

WE C Hope Blog

A young girl with a dressing over one eye sits on her mother's lap, while a medical professional crouches so his face is level with hers. He offers his open hands to her, palms up. All three people are African.

How to Advocate for Child Life Support in Your Child’s Medical Care

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Parenting children through retinoblastoma is tough.  Being their chief advocate is one of your most important roles throughout their cancer experience.  Rb Survivor and WE C Hope CEO, Abby White, discusses why parents and caregivers should advocate for child life support, how to ask for child life services, and how to work effectively with child life professionals for the best outcomes.
Leslie sitting in a rocking chair at the hospital, holding 7 month old Thomas, Mason and Luke. Thomas is dressed in a blue and white striped outfit, wearing a blue eye patch on his right eye, Mason is dressed in green hospital scrubs with an IV that is out-of-frame. Luke is also dressed in a blue and white outfit. All the boys are alert with wide open eyes and partial smiles. Leslie's lap is quite full.

Triplets with Cancer: Surviving and Thriving Through the Unexpected

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A retinoblastoma diagnosis is shocking for parents, and the journey through complex specialist care can be highly stressful. RB1 genetics mean this cancer often affects more than one child in a family. Leslie Low shares her experience of caring for her triplets – all diagnosed with cancer in both eyes, and the things that helped her family cope; physically, psychologically, and practically.
“Breathe! When we’re anxious or angry, we tense up, hold our breath or breathe fast and shallow, increasing stress even more. Slow, deep breathing almost instantly diffuses tension, helping us feel calm, clear-headed and in control. Add some aromatherapy or a mindful walk in fresh air for a greater oasis of calm.” Image to the left shows a young girl in profile, holding a bubble wand and blowing bubbles. The background is filed with bubbles in clear focus against the blurred gold and green of a natural landscape.

26 Ways to Nurture Mind and Body: revisit the 2021 Alphabet of Hope

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Throughout 2021, our fourth Alphabet of Hope shared top tips for practical action to reduce stress and nurture mind and body. Bilateral Rb Survivor and WE C Hope Volunteer CEO, Abby White, introduces our complete 2021 alphabet, and offers suggestions for creating your own Self-Care Action Plan to help ease stress through difficult moments and tough days.
A young girl sucking a pacifier rests with her head on a pillow. Her eye is swollen from recent treatment.

Trauma-Informed Sleep Supports: How to Help Your Child When Traditional Sleep Supports Are Not Enough

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Sleep is vital to a child’s healthy development, and there are many simple, practical ways parents and caregivers can support healthful sleep. But what happens when stress and traumatic experiences affect a child’s sleep? Paediatric nurse and child life specialist, Cindy Pilchuk, offers practical trauma-informed sleep supports to aid children’s coping and restorative sleep.

Photographers

A baby has one red pupil and one white pupul - the classic early sign of eye cancer in children.

Know The Glow!

Learn about the most common early sign of childhood eye cancer – a white reflection in the pupil, seen in dim light and flash photos. Find out how to take photos to check for signs of serious eye disease in children.

Parents & Survivors

Find Hope

We offer the Retinoblastoma Resource to supplement information provided by your medical team, answer questions and concerns about all aspects of life with Rb, increase understanding and share hope.

Family & Friends

How You Can Help

Forget “let me know if I can do anything to help”! Carefully considered and offered support will be truly valued.  We have many suggestions from parents that have brought families relief, joy and hope.

Give Hope

Sun reflects gold on Daisy's hair as she smiles and laughs while clutching a big bunch of daisies.

Help Change Lives!

There are so many ways you can help us bring hope of cure and better quality of life to children with eye cancer, families and survivors.  Donate online now, or become a fundraising angel. Together, WE C Hope!

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