A pink banner with the words “register now” spans the top of the image. Diamond Head in Honolulu is bathed in light, under a slightly cloudy blue sky. The One Rb World logo includes a yellow flower for Hawaii. Text reads: One Retinoblastoma World | Virtual Conference | October 1-3, 2021

Register Now for One Retinoblastoma World 2021 Virtual Conference!

Join World Eye Cancer Hope and local organizers from Australia for the sixth One Retinoblastoma World Conference, taking place virtually from October 1 – 3, 2021. Marissa Gonzalez, WE C Hope USA President, and this year’s Hosting Chair, introduces the conference and what’s in store for this unique collaborative program uniting professionals, families and survivors.

Two photo panels side by side. On the left, a baby boy is seen with the left eye turning in towards his nose. On the right, a baby girl has a red reflex in her right eye, while her left eye shows a dull creamy-white reflex.

Eye of the Storm: the impact of ‘not knowing’ on mental health

Retinoblastoma Awareness Week promotes life and sight-saving early diagnosis. Sandra Staffieri, Rb Care Coordinator at the Royal Children’s Hospital Melbourne, highlights the importance of raising awareness among parents, caregivers, health professionals and survivors; and how lack of knowledge and delayed diagnosis can impact children, parents, and adults with second cancer risk.

One Rb World 2020 Banner. Background shows the Ottawa skyline at sunset. Above the One Rb World logo, text reads: October 3-4, 2020, Ottawa, Canada (struckthrough text) | Virtual Conference. At the bottom of the image, text reads “Hosted By” followed by four logos of World Eye Cancer Hope, the Canadian Rb Society, Canadian Rb Research Advisory Board, and International Rb Consortium.

One Retinoblastoma World 2020: Inspiring Global Support, Research and Action.

In October, a diverse community of survivors, families and medical professionals came together at One Retinoblastoma World for two days of inspiring panels, research and calls to action.  WE C Hope USA President Marissa D. Gonzalez shares a recap of the fifth global conference, and her vision for next year’s event in Hawaii.

A female adult plays patient, cared for by a group of children dressed in medical outfits. She wears an eye patch on her left eye, and the children put bandaids on her arms. One of the children is wearing an anaesthetic mask.

Child Life Programs: Play With Purpose at Retinoblastoma Gatherings

Eye cancer is a potentially overwhelming experience for young children, whether patient or sibling. Child life can radically improve care and life for the entire family, but too many children lack access to this specialist support. Abby White shares how WE C Hope supported Child Life programs are helping to change that.

International Care: Challenges and Opportunities

Families and medical professionals worldwide seek retinoblastoma care at centres offering treatments that are unavailable in their home country. Many families contact WE C Hope for assistance before, during or after such treatment. Abby White explores the challenges they experience and what can be done to help improve outcomes for their children.

An African doctor looks on as another uses a handheld digital camera to visualise a child's eyes during an exam under anaesthesia.

TNM Staging System for Retinoblastoma

Retinoblastoma is staged to help doctors describe the extent of cancer in a child’s body, define potential for cure, vision and eye salvage, identify the best treatments, and compare impact of different therapies. Dr. Ashwin Mallipatna explains the TNM Staging System for Retinoblastoma and why it is the best approach for patient care.

Dr. Skalet examines a child under anesthesia using an indirect ophthalmoscope. Published with permission.

Familial Retinoblastoma Screening: When Eye Cancer Runs in the Family

Familial retinoblastoma affects more than one member of the same family. Diagnosing children early provides the best opportunities for life and sight-saving care. Alison Skalet, ocular oncologist and director of the Rb service at Casey Eye Institute, Oregon Health & Science University, explores opportunities for early diagnosis when a parent, sibling or other relative has already been diagnosed.

Latifa and her mother

Retinoblastoma in Ghana: Saving Children’s Life and Sight

Just 3 paediatric oncologists serve Ghana’s population of 29 million, but this dedicated team leads one of the best childhood cancer programs in West Africa. Dr. Vera Essuman (paediatric ophthalmologist) and Prof. Lorna Renner (paediatric oncologist) discuss retinoblastoma in Ghana and the development of care for children with eye cancer across the country.

Jayne and a child are pictured wearing long yarn wigs of different colours.

Jayne Kamau, My Friend and Colleague

On March 10, 2019, our beloved child life specialist Jayne Kamau died aboard Ethiopian Airlines flight ET302 as she returned home from SIOPAfrica in Cairo. WE C Hope Child Life Director, Morgan Livingstone, reflects on more than a decade of mentoring, friendship and working together to advance child life in Kenya. Co-authored with WE C Hope CEO, Abby White.

Artistic tree in white and gold ribbon on red background, surrounded by snow and tiny and large snowflakes. Below, a wave of opaque white ribbon flows across the image.

Our 2018 Blog Year in Review

The WE C Hope blog has been busy in 2018. We’ve shared 24 posts from 17 authors – parents, survivors, researchers or professionals providing retinoblastoma-related care. Each has brought valuable experience, knowledge and perspective, and we are very thankful to them all. Here is a recap of posts we’ve shared in the past 12 months.