Fire Poppies – vibrant golden petals and green leaves brighten a scorched landscape.

8 Ways to Heal Survivor Guilt

Anyone affected by retinoblastoma can experience survivor guilt – child and adult survivors, siblings, parents, grandparents, and others. WE C Hope CEO and Rb Survivor Abby White concludes this four-part series on Survivor Guilt with 8 practical suggestions to help acknowledge, move through, and heal from the destructive emotions that fuel survivor guilt.

Understanding Survivor Guilt

Survivor guilt of some kind is an almost universal experience for individuals affected by retinoblastoma – survivors and siblings of all ages, parents, grandparents, and others. Continuing our four-part series on Survivor Guilt, WE C Hope CEO and Rb Survivor Abby White explores the causes, risk factors, and underlying emotions.

an anchor tethers a bright red hot air balloon floating in a grey sky.

7 Ways Retinoblastoma Families and Survivors Experience Survivor Guilt – part 2

Anyone affected by retinoblastoma can experience survivor guilt – survivors and siblings of all ages, parents, grandparents, partners, and others.  WE C Hope CEO and Rb Survivor Abby White continues to explore the many ways in which family members experience survivor guilt, and the potential impacts during treatment and throughout life.

A red butterfly is reflected in water as it hovers above, against a pale blue sky.

7 Ways Retinoblastoma Families and Survivors Experience Survivor Guilt – part 1

The life-changing experience of retinoblastoma can weave a legacy of survivor guilt that may affect anyone in the family – child and adult survivors, siblings, parents, grandparents, and others.  WE C Hope CEO and Rb Survivor Abby White highlights the many ways in which family members experience survivor guilt, and the potential impacts during treatment and throughout life.

Text reads “Retinoblastoma Treatment Decisions 12 Step Guide”. The background is a blue painted wood table. To the right of the text, a pen rests on the blank open page of a notebook. Around the notebook sits a pair of glasses, a cup of coffee, and a small plant with green leaves.

New Treatment Decision Making Guide

Parents face many decisions about their child’s retinoblastoma treatment. The experience can be complex, highly emotive, and stressful. WE C Hope CEO Abby White introduces our new comprehensive guide to making treatment decisions, a tool to help parents navigate the process and make the best choices at every stage of their child’s eye cancer journey.

Marissa and her mother are smiling at the camera. Marissa is wearing a black and gold number 6 USC football jersey. Her mom is wearing a cardinal USC shirt. Behind them stands the statue of Tommy Trojan on the USC campus.

A Milestone Anniversary: Celebrating 30 Years Being Cancer Free

For many children and their families, eye cancer diagnosis begins a lifetime journey, with many twists and turns through treatment and long after being declared cancer free. World Eye Cancer Hope USA President Marissa D. Gonzalez reflects on three decades being cancer free from retinoblastoma, the journey of a cancer survivor, and the future with her cancerversary fundraiser.

Three young girls stand together on a lawn, against a backdrop of lush foliage.

How to Support Siblings Receiving Retinoblastoma Screening

Medical appointments, assessments and tests are potentially stressful for anyone, at any age. Cancer screening can be especially difficult if the one being screened is the young sibling of a child diagnosed with retinoblastoma. Child life specialist Morgan Livingstone explores why siblings need cancer screening, and how to help them understand and cope with their medical experience.

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Remembering Dr. A Linn Murphree

With a heavy heart, we share the news that Dr. A Linn Murphree, Professor of Ophthalmology, Founder of the Vision Center, and Director of the Retinoblastoma Program at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles and USC, passed peacefully on March 9th, 2022. Linn was a tremendous force in ocular oncology, advancing knowledge of the RB1 gene, and care for children with retinoblastoma.

A woman faces a crying young girl, gazing at her with a concerned expression as the child site with her head in her hands. She is resting one comforting hand against the girl’s head, and the other on her opposite forearm.

Your Child is Not Misbehaving: How Stress Affects Behaviour

All children exhibit undesirable behaviour at times, particularly when they are stressed, but deliberate misbehaviour is rare. Paediatric nurse and child life specialist, Cindy Pilchuk, explores how a child’s brain responds to stress and emotional overwhelm, what their stress behaviour may be trying to say, and how parents and caregivers can help children cope better.

A young girl with a dressing over one eye sits on her mother's lap, while a medical professional crouches so his face is level with hers. He offers his open hands to her, palms up. All three people are African.

How to Advocate for Child Life Support in Your Child’s Medical Care

Parenting children through retinoblastoma is tough.  Being their chief advocate is one of your most important roles throughout their cancer experience.  Rb Survivor and WE C Hope CEO, Abby White, discusses why parents and caregivers should advocate for child life support, how to ask for child life services, and how to work effectively with child life professionals for the best outcomes.