A child life specialist blows bubbles through an anesthesia mask towards a little girl

Child Life in Retinoblastoma Care

Child life can profoundly impact a child’s experience of retinoblastoma, and their quality of life. However, many children treated at specialist retinoblastoma centres lack child life support, and their parents feel unsupported, compared with other cancer patients. Abby White explores the challenges and ways to overcome them.

A female adult plays patient, cared for by a group of children dressed in medical outfits. She wears an eye patch on her left eye, and the children put bandaids on her arms. One of the children is wearing an anaesthetic mask.

Child Life Programs: Play With Purpose at Retinoblastoma Gatherings

Eye cancer is a potentially overwhelming experience for young children, whether patient or sibling. Child life can radically improve care and life for the entire family, but too many children lack access to this specialist support. Abby White shares how WE C Hope supported Child Life programs are helping to change that.

International Care: Challenges and Opportunities

Families and medical professionals worldwide seek retinoblastoma care at centres offering treatments that are unavailable in their home country. Many families contact WE C Hope for assistance before, during or after such treatment. Abby White explores the challenges they experience and what can be done to help improve outcomes for their children.

A young girl and her father share a smile

Perfect Vision: Care and Cure for Children with Eye Cancer in Developing Countries

Retinoblastoma is highly curable with early diagnosis and modern therapies. But 90% of affected children live in developing countries, and globally, less than 3 in 10 children survive. Rb survivor and volunteer CEO, Abby White, explores the biggest challenges to care in developing countries, and some ways to overcome them.

A group of teenagers enjoy a game of volleyball on a sand court surrounded by trees, under a cloud-dusted blue sky.

When Survivors Grow Up: Family Experiences After Retinoblastoma

Retinoblastoma is highly curable, but lifelong impacts are significant for survivors, siblings, parents and extended family. After a particularly painful personal insight, Rb survivor and WE C Hope CEO Abby White asked families and survivors about their own experiences of life beyond childhood eye cancer care.

Celebrating Annie: Guide Dog Retires from WE C Hope Team

Annie, an important member of our team, retired on April 15th. Abby White, retinoblastoma survivor, WE C Hope founder and volunteer CEO, reflects on working with her guide dog for seven years. She considers the many varied gifts Annie has brought to both herself as an individual retinoblastoma survivor, and to WE C Hope.

Jayne and a child are pictured wearing long yarn wigs of different colours.

Jayne Kamau, My Friend and Colleague

On March 10, 2019, our beloved child life specialist Jayne Kamau died aboard Ethiopian Airlines flight ET302 as she returned home from SIOPAfrica in Cairo. WE C Hope Child Life Director, Morgan Livingstone, reflects on more than a decade of mentoring, friendship and working together to advance child life in Kenya. Co-authored with WE C Hope CEO, Abby White.

Abby walks across a vast desert plain, alongside a Massai warrior. Abby is wearing neutral coloured trekking gear and sunhat, carrying a backpack with a drinking tube visible attached to one strap, and holding walking poles. Her companion is wearing wraps of blue, black, red and gold checkered and striped cloth, and various bead ornaments, and carries a walking pole.

Different Perspectives – Meet Our Founder

Abby White, WE C Hope co-founder and volunteer CEO, shares her experience of living with the consequences of bilateral retinoblastoma, and her very personal journey to the organization’s birth.

Close encounters with Giraffe.

Trek for Hope: a golden opportunity to make a difference.

Looking forward to Daisy Fund’s Africa Bush Trek marking Childhood Cancer Month 2014, Abby White recalls her 2005 adventure through Tanzania’s captivating wilderness. An epic experience raising funds that bring hope of life and sight saving care to children with eye cancer and their families.