A person's hands are seen typing on a laptop

Social Media Support: 10 Reasons Why Exchanging Medical Advice can be Unhelpful, and What to do Instead

When someone asks for support on social media, instincts drives us to offer hopeful solutions. But without full knowledge and understanding, we may cause more harm than help. Reviewing real interactions and their outcomes, WE C Hope CEO, Abby White, shares key points to consider when discussing retinoblastoma, and how to respond well.

A hand reaches through the screen of a laptop to hold the hand of the person standing in front of it. The person standing is reflected in the screen of the laptop.

Social Media Support: 7 Ways to Respond Effectively, and Why Our Responses Matter

How we respond to one another in retinoblastoma support forums, and the information we share, can significantly impact patient care and outcomes. Abby White shares 7 ways we can respond positively to any social media request for help, to improve communication, support, and best care for the child/survivor and family.

Flood: “Once you hear the sentence “your child has cancer” it is a constant flood till the end of treatment. It’s a flood of emotions, flood of information, flood of doubts, but in the middle of the flood you look at your child and you find the strength to keep your head out of water to survive.” Jackie, Mother of a Rb fighter. Image to the right shows a black and white photo taken underwater of a submerged woman wearing a long, white, sleeveless dress. Her face is above the waterline as her feet appear to be paddling and her arms extend to the sides.

Alphabet of Hope: Rewriting the Future of Retinoblastoma Care

After a year of publishing the #FamilyInSight Alphabet of Hope, we bring you the complete collection of 2020 Entries. This is the third #AlphabetOfHope. WE C Hope CEO, Abby White looks back at the alphabet’s genesis, and the insight, wisdom and motivation this literary project brings to the retinoblastoma community.

The words “Thank You” are written in script on a dark red background infused with light, surrounded by glowing red, gold and white love hearts.

Happy Holidays from World Eye Cancer Hope!

2020 has been eventful and challenging for the whole world.  Throughout, WE C Hope has continued to serve, unite and advance our global retinoblastoma community. WE C Hope USA President and retinoblastoma survivor, Marissa Gonzalez, reflects on the year’s highlights with thanks, and shares some plans for the coming year.

One Rb World 2020 Banner. Background shows the Ottawa skyline at sunset. Above the One Rb World logo, text reads: October 3-4, 2020, Ottawa, Canada (struckthrough text) | Virtual Conference. At the bottom of the image, text reads “Hosted By” followed by four logos of World Eye Cancer Hope, the Canadian Rb Society, Canadian Rb Research Advisory Board, and International Rb Consortium.

One Retinoblastoma World 2020: Inspiring Global Support, Research and Action.

In October, a diverse community of survivors, families and medical professionals came together at One Retinoblastoma World for two days of inspiring panels, research and calls to action.  WE C Hope USA President Marissa D. Gonzalez shares a recap of the fifth global conference, and her vision for next year’s event in Hawaii.

A boy wearing a hospital gown lies in hospital bed. He is attached to many monitors and tubes, smiling and giving a thumbs up.

10 Things Parents Want You to Know About Retinoblastoma

Caring for a child with retinoblastoma and healthy siblings is a complex journey for parents, from before diagnosis, through treatment, and beyond. Rb Mom and WE C Hope USA director, Lori Banos, shares 10 key messages parents have for health care professionals, fellow parents and the wider community.

If You Tell Them, They Will Know: raising awareness of retinoblastoma signs can save lives, eyes and sight.

Strabismus (turned eye) and leukocoria (white pupil) are the most common early signs of retinoblastoma.  Sandra Staffieri, Rb Care Co-ordinator at the Royal Children’s Hospital, Melbourne, explores why parent and healthcare provider awareness of these signs is vital to early diagnosis of childhood eye cancer.

Questions About COVID-19 and Retinoblastoma

People around the world are feeling anxious about the coronavirus pandemic. We understand the concern is especially acute for parents of children with retinoblastoma, and survivors who have chronic health conditions and second cancer diagnosis. Here we answer questions we have received about the virus.

International Care: Challenges and Opportunities

Families and medical professionals worldwide seek retinoblastoma care at centres offering treatments that are unavailable in their home country. Many families contact WE C Hope for assistance before, during or after such treatment. Abby White explores the challenges they experience and what can be done to help improve outcomes for their children.

A young girl and her father share a smile

Perfect Vision: Care and Cure for Children with Eye Cancer in Developing Countries

Retinoblastoma is highly curable with early diagnosis and modern therapies. But 90% of affected children live in developing countries, and globally, less than 3 in 10 children survive. Rb survivor and volunteer CEO, Abby White, explores the biggest challenges to care in developing countries, and some ways to overcome them.