A pink banner with the words “register now” spans the top of the image. Diamond Head in Honolulu is bathed in light, under a slightly cloudy blue sky. The One Rb World logo includes a yellow flower for Hawaii. Text reads: One Retinoblastoma World | Virtual Conference | October 1-3, 2021

Register Now for One Retinoblastoma World 2021 Virtual Conference!

Join World Eye Cancer Hope and local organizers from Australia for the sixth One Retinoblastoma World Conference, taking place virtually from October 1 – 3, 2021. Marissa Gonzalez, WE C Hope USA President, and this year’s Hosting Chair, introduces the conference and what’s in store for this unique collaborative program uniting professionals, families and survivors.

Two photo panels side by side. On the left, a baby boy is seen with the left eye turning in towards his nose. On the right, a baby girl has a red reflex in her right eye, while her left eye shows a dull creamy-white reflex.

Eye of the Storm: the impact of ‘not knowing’ on mental health

Retinoblastoma Awareness Week promotes life and sight-saving early diagnosis. Sandra Staffieri, Rb Care Coordinator at the Royal Children’s Hospital Melbourne, highlights the importance of raising awareness among parents, caregivers, health professionals and survivors; and how lack of knowledge and delayed diagnosis can impact children, parents, and adults with second cancer risk.

Flood: “Once you hear the sentence “your child has cancer” it is a constant flood till the end of treatment. It’s a flood of emotions, flood of information, flood of doubts, but in the middle of the flood you look at your child and you find the strength to keep your head out of water to survive.” Jackie, Mother of a Rb fighter. Image to the right shows a black and white photo taken underwater of a submerged woman wearing a long, white, sleeveless dress. Her face is above the waterline as her feet appear to be paddling and her arms extend to the sides.

Alphabet of Hope: Rewriting the Future of Retinoblastoma Care

After a year of publishing the #FamilyInSight Alphabet of Hope, we bring you the complete collection of 2020 Entries. This is the third #AlphabetOfHope. WE C Hope CEO, Abby White looks back at the alphabet’s genesis, and the insight, wisdom and motivation this literary project brings to the retinoblastoma community.

One Rb World 2020 Banner. Background shows the Ottawa skyline at sunset. Above the One Rb World logo, text reads: October 3-4, 2020, Ottawa, Canada (struckthrough text) | Virtual Conference. At the bottom of the image, text reads “Hosted By” followed by four logos of World Eye Cancer Hope, the Canadian Rb Society, Canadian Rb Research Advisory Board, and International Rb Consortium.

One Retinoblastoma World 2020: Inspiring Global Support, Research and Action.

In October, a diverse community of survivors, families and medical professionals came together at One Retinoblastoma World for two days of inspiring panels, research and calls to action.  WE C Hope USA President Marissa D. Gonzalez shares a recap of the fifth global conference, and her vision for next year’s event in Hawaii.

Retinoblastoma Treatment and Vision – The Double-Edged Sword

When eye cancer is diagnosed early, it may be possible to save a child’s eye or even sight. But tumours and treatments themselves affect vision. Sandra Staffieri, orthoptist and Rb Care Co-ordinator at the Royal Children’s Hospital, Melbourne, reviews how different retinoblastoma therapies can impact the eye, and how parents can support their child.

A boy wearing a hospital gown lies in hospital bed. He is attached to many monitors and tubes, smiling and giving a thumbs up.

10 Things Parents Want You to Know About Retinoblastoma

Caring for a child with retinoblastoma and healthy siblings is a complex journey for parents, from before diagnosis, through treatment, and beyond. Rb Mom and WE C Hope USA director, Lori Banos, shares 10 key messages parents have for health care professionals, fellow parents and the wider community.

A woman wearing a harness stands on a ship high above the waves. The setting sun and sail ropes are visible behind her.

10 Things Retinoblastoma Survivors Want You To Know

Retinoblastoma is highly curable. But for many survivors, it has lifelong impacts. In 2019, our Alphabet of Hope shared survivor insights of #LifeBeyondRb. Rb Survivor and 2019 alphabet curator, Abby White, highlights 10 important messages from survivors about life beyond treatment and cure of childhood eye cancer.

If You Tell Them, They Will Know: raising awareness of retinoblastoma signs can save lives, eyes and sight.

Strabismus (turned eye) and leukocoria (white pupil) are the most common early signs of retinoblastoma.  Sandra Staffieri, Rb Care Co-ordinator at the Royal Children’s Hospital, Melbourne, explores why parent and healthcare provider awareness of these signs is vital to early diagnosis of childhood eye cancer.

A child life specialist blows bubbles through an anesthesia mask towards a little girl

Child Life in Retinoblastoma Care

Child life can profoundly impact a child’s experience of retinoblastoma, and their quality of life. However, many children treated at specialist retinoblastoma centres lack child life support, and their parents feel unsupported, compared with other cancer patients. Abby White explores the challenges and ways to overcome them.

A young girl and her father share a smile

Perfect Vision: Care and Cure for Children with Eye Cancer in Developing Countries

Retinoblastoma is highly curable with early diagnosis and modern therapies. But 90% of affected children live in developing countries, and globally, less than 3 in 10 children survive. Rb survivor and volunteer CEO, Abby White, explores the biggest challenges to care in developing countries, and some ways to overcome them.