If You Tell Them, They Will Know: raising awareness of retinoblastoma signs can save lives, eyes and sight.

Strabismus (turned eye) and leukocoria (white pupil) are the most common early signs of retinoblastoma.  Sandra Staffieri, Rb Care Co-ordinator at the Royal Children’s Hospital, Melbourne, explores why parent and healthcare provider awareness of these signs is vital to early diagnosis of childhood eye cancer.

A child life specialist blows bubbles through an anesthesia mask towards a little girl

Child Life in Retinoblastoma Care

Child life can profoundly impact a child’s experience of retinoblastoma, and their quality of life. However, many children treated at specialist retinoblastoma centres lack child life support, and their parents feel unsupported, compared with other cancer patients. Abby White explores the challenges and ways to overcome them.

A young girl and her father share a smile

Perfect Vision: Care and Cure for Children with Eye Cancer in Developing Countries

Retinoblastoma is highly curable with early diagnosis and modern therapies. But 90% of affected children live in developing countries, and globally, less than 3 in 10 children survive. Rb survivor and volunteer CEO, Abby White, explores the biggest challenges to care in developing countries, and some ways to overcome them.

Text above reads: "Speak Up" Image of an open book, its pages glowing gold and emitting sparks of light. Text below reads: "Share Your Retinoblastoma Story."

4 Key Ways Sharing Your Story Makes a Difference, and Tips for Telling

Every individual in the retinoblastoma community has a unique story to tell – whether parent, survivor, sibling, professional, extended family member or supporter. Abby White explores the importance of storytelling, and the many ways in which sharing your story can make a difference – to your own life, and to the world.

Close up of a child with leukocoria detected by CRADLE, with results boxes around both eyes and magnified images of both eyes below the main photo.

From CRADLE to Care: Your Photos Can Help Scientists Build an App for Parents to Diagnose Serious Child Eye Disease Early.

A White pupil is the most common early sign of eye cancer in young children, and it’s usually seen first in photos. Do you want to turn your smartphone into a powerful cancer-detector? Mark Billings, WE C Hope USA Director, tells the story behind the CRADLE app and explains how you can help scientists improve it.

A group of teenagers enjoy a game of volleyball on a sand court surrounded by trees, under a cloud-dusted blue sky.

When Survivors Grow Up: Family Experiences After Retinoblastoma

Retinoblastoma is highly curable, but lifelong impacts are significant for survivors, siblings, parents and extended family. After a particularly painful personal insight, Rb survivor and WE C Hope CEO Abby White asked families and survivors about their own experiences of life beyond childhood eye cancer care.

Close-up of a baby's face

How Do I Create A Family When I Have An RB1 Mutation?

Individuals who carry an RB1 mutation have a 50% chance of passing the retinoblastoma cancer syndrome on to each child.  Melissa Mills, bilateral retinoblastoma survivor and genetic counsellor, explores the psychological and physical impacts of this experience, and the different routes to creating a family when a prospective parent has an RB1 mutation..

Five smooth pebbles are stacked in decreasing size on a beach, where lively surf rolls into shore. The high sky is clear blue, with a few clouds above the horizon, which is lightly tinged with a pale peachy glow of sunrise or sunset.

Mindfulness Tips for Retinoblastoma Families and Supporting Teachers

Living with the daily effects of childhood eye cancer can be overwhelming, for all family members. Both the immediate crisis of diagnosis and treatment, and the long-term impacts and risks. Child Life Intern and Student Teacher, Meagan Fuller, highlights some simple mindfulness techniques parents and children can use to ease daily tension.

An African doctor looks on as another uses a handheld digital camera to visualise a child's eyes during an exam under anaesthesia.

TNM Staging System for Retinoblastoma

Retinoblastoma is staged to help doctors describe the extent of cancer in a child’s body, define potential for cure, vision and eye salvage, identify the best treatments, and compare impact of different therapies. Dr. Ashwin Mallipatna explains the TNM Staging System for Retinoblastoma and why it is the best approach for patient care.

A woman sits alone on a bench under a sprawling weeping willow tree in a park. She is facing away from the camera.

Retinoblastoma Survivors’ Perspectives on Long-Term Follow up Care

Many retinoblastoma survivors live with significant long term treatment impacts and second cancer risks. Yet most children, adult survivors and their families struggle to access appropriate ongoing care. Len Burns, a totally blind bilateral Rb survivor and licensed family therapist, highlights the most common survivor concerns, and potential ways to improve long term care and quality of life.