Promotional card in tropical colours. Text reads: "One Retinoblastoma World. Virtual Conference, October 1-3. A global conference for eye and cancer specialists, researchers, parents, and survivors. Register Today!” www.wechope.org/onerbworld

Register Now for One Retinoblastoma World 2021 – Sharing Ideas, Opportunities and Friendship

As the 6th One Retinoblastoma World Conference fast approaches, this year’s organizers Sandra Staffieri and Marissa Gonzalez, together with Megan Webber, are excited to share an update. They give an overview of the program, highlighting some of the sessions and goals, and the need for global discussion and collaboration involving all stakeholders.

Two photo panels side by side. On the left, a baby boy is seen with the left eye turning in towards his nose. On the right, a baby girl has a red reflex in her right eye, while her left eye shows a dull creamy-white reflex.

Eye of the Storm: the impact of ‘not knowing’ on mental health

Retinoblastoma Awareness Week promotes life and sight-saving early diagnosis. Sandra Staffieri, Rb Care Coordinator at the Royal Children’s Hospital Melbourne, highlights the importance of raising awareness among parents, caregivers, health professionals and survivors; and how lack of knowledge and delayed diagnosis can impact children, parents, and adults with second cancer risk.

Lesley is sitting talking to a family in the hospital playroom. There are no other people in the frame. They are sitting at a round table, dad is holding his young son on his lap The child is wearing a Woody Toy Story character outfit, and laughing. Mum is sitting at the same table, wearing a green top and is laughing. Lesley is wearing a flowery top, is talking to the family and smiling. There are colourful toys on the table.

Childhood Eye Cancer Trust Support Workers: helping UK families and individuals through treatment and beyond

A retinoblastoma diagnosis is distressing for a family, its effects often lifelong. CHECT Support Workers help families and individuals in the UK, from diagnosis and throughout life. Support Service Manager, Lesley Geen, describes how CHECT Support Workers collaborate with the medical team to care for the whole family, and the different support services offered at each stage of life.

Eleni stands on a waterside path. A little distance behid her, a fountain shoots a tall jet of water high into the air.

Life After Enucleation: 8 Retinoblastoma Survivors Share Hope

Despite advances in eye saving therapy for retinoblastoma, removing a child’s eye remains the most common treatment worldwide. Rb survivor and WE C Hope CEO, Abby White, shares her perspective of life after enucleation, and experiences from seven fellow survivors, offering hope to parents facing the reality of enucleation.

A female adult plays patient, cared for by a group of children dressed in medical outfits. She wears an eye patch on her left eye, and the children put bandaids on her arms. One of the children is wearing an anaesthetic mask.

Child Life Programs: Play With Purpose at Retinoblastoma Gatherings

Eye cancer is a potentially overwhelming experience for young children, whether patient or sibling. Child life can radically improve care and life for the entire family, but too many children lack access to this specialist support. Abby White shares how WE C Hope supported Child Life programs are helping to change that.

International Care: Challenges and Opportunities

Families and medical professionals worldwide seek retinoblastoma care at centres offering treatments that are unavailable in their home country. Many families contact WE C Hope for assistance before, during or after such treatment. Abby White explores the challenges they experience and what can be done to help improve outcomes for their children.

Close-up of a baby's face

How Do I Create A Family When I Have An RB1 Mutation?

Individuals who carry an RB1 mutation have a 50% chance of passing the retinoblastoma cancer syndrome on to each child.  Melissa Mills, bilateral retinoblastoma survivor and genetic counsellor, explores the psychological and physical impacts of this experience, and the different routes to creating a family when a prospective parent has an RB1 mutation..

A woman sits alone on a bench under a sprawling weeping willow tree in a park. She is facing away from the camera.

Retinoblastoma Survivors’ Perspectives on Long-Term Follow up Care

Many retinoblastoma survivors live with significant long term treatment impacts and second cancer risks. Yet most children, adult survivors and their families struggle to access appropriate ongoing care. Len Burns, a totally blind bilateral Rb survivor and licensed family therapist, highlights the most common survivor concerns, and potential ways to improve long term care and quality of life.

Celebrating Annie: Guide Dog Retires from WE C Hope Team

Annie, an important member of our team, retired on April 15th. Abby White, retinoblastoma survivor, WE C Hope founder and volunteer CEO, reflects on working with her guide dog for seven years. She considers the many varied gifts Annie has brought to both herself as an individual retinoblastoma survivor, and to WE C Hope.

Dr. Skalet examines a child under anesthesia using an indirect ophthalmoscope. Published with permission.

Familial Retinoblastoma Screening: When Eye Cancer Runs in the Family

Familial retinoblastoma affects more than one member of the same family. Diagnosing children early provides the best opportunities for life and sight-saving care. Alison Skalet, ocular oncologist and director of the Rb service at Casey Eye Institute, Oregon Health & Science University, explores opportunities for early diagnosis when a parent, sibling or other relative has already been diagnosed.