Celebrating Annie: Guide Dog Retires from WE C Hope Team

Annie, an important member of our team, retired on April 15th. Abby White, retinoblastoma survivor, WE C Hope founder and volunteer CEO, reflects on working with her guide dog for seven years. She considers the many varied gifts Annie has brought to both herself as an individual retinoblastoma survivor, and to WE C Hope.

Latifa and her mother

Retinoblastoma in Ghana: Saving Children’s Life and Sight

Just 3 paediatric oncologists serve Ghana’s population of 29 million, but this dedicated team leads one of the best childhood cancer programs in West Africa. Dr. Vera Essuman (paediatric ophthalmologist) and Prof. Lorna Renner (paediatric oncologist) discuss retinoblastoma in Ghana and the development of care for children with eye cancer across the country.

Jayne and a child are pictured wearing long yarn wigs of different colours.

Jayne Kamau, My Friend and Colleague

On March 10, 2019, our beloved child life specialist Jayne Kamau died aboard Ethiopian Airlines flight ET302 as she returned home from SIOPAfrica in Cairo. WE C Hope Child Life Director, Morgan Livingstone, reflects on more than a decade of mentoring, friendship and working together to advance child life in Kenya. Co-authored with WE C Hope CEO, Abby White.

Two young girls, one Caucasian, one African, recline together on a blue sofa, smiling.

Challenging the Global Retinoblastoma Burden on World Population Day

July 11, World Population Day, focuses attention on the urgency and importance of population issues. Helen Dimaras Ph.D considers the effect of our expanding global population on the expected numbers of children who will develop eye cancer each year, and the provision of effective care to meet their needs.

A fuzzy cloud shows recurrence of a previously treated tumour.

Visualizing Cancer Treatment

Have you ever wondered what happens in a child’s eye during retinoblastoma treatment? We explore four of the most common eye-saving treatments here. Below each, you will find a link to further information that includes advantages, disadvantages, side effects and questions to ask the doctor.

The Lincoln Memorial, lit up in gold against a deep blue sky.

Revisit One Rb World and SIOP 2016 (Dublin)

We are looking forward to One Rb World and SIOP 2017 in Washington D.C. this October. Read about the 2016 One Rb World meeting and International Society of Paediatric Oncology World Congress in this blog mini series, originally shared later last year.

Rati with her new eye during treatment in Canada.

Rati’s Hope-filled Legacy, Ten Years On

Today we celebrate Rati, the beautiful, bright, bubbly butterfly who came so briefly into our lives, changed us all so dramatically and inspired the foundation of WE C Hope. Ultimately, expert care came too late and we could not save her life. Rati had plans of her own though. She taught us to see and hear and understand the needs of families like her own, and she challenged us to do something to help change their experience of retinoblastoma.

Close encounters with Giraffe.

Trek for Hope: a golden opportunity to make a difference.

Looking forward to Daisy Fund’s Africa Bush Trek marking Childhood Cancer Month 2014, Abby White recalls her 2005 adventure through Tanzania’s captivating wilderness. An epic experience raising funds that bring hope of life and sight saving care to children with eye cancer and their families.

Beautiful Rati During Treatment.

In Her Memory…

11 years ago, a new baby girl was born in Botswana. Four short years later, retinoblastoma claimed her life. Her name means love, and today, her legacy continues to build hope for other children around the world.

RbCoLab pathology scanner

Grand Challenges: Life Saving Cancer Pathology in Africa

Our Global Rb Scientist, Dr. Helen Dimaras, is leading a major initiative to advance digital pathology consultations at our pathology Lab in Nairobi, thanks to a $100,000 grant from Grand Challenges Canada. The digital RbCoLab will significantly improve care for each child by rapidly identifying their true risk and need for further treatment after their eye has been removed.