Enucleation, Life and Support: A Parent and Survivor Perspective

When a child has retinoblastoma, removing the affected eye remains the most common treatment worldwide to save life. Support is vital throughout treatment and long after. Lori and Grace Padilla share the perspective of a parent and a young adult survivor, their thoughts on enucleation, and the benefits of in-person support groups.

A boy wearing a hospital gown lies in hospital bed. He is attached to many monitors and tubes, smiling and giving a thumbs up.

10 Things Parents Want You to Know About Retinoblastoma

Caring for a child with retinoblastoma and healthy siblings is a complex journey for parents, from before diagnosis, through treatment, and beyond. Rb Mom and WE C Hope USA director, Lori Banos, shares 10 key messages parents have for health care professionals, fellow parents and the wider community.

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10 Things Retinoblastoma Survivors Want You To Know

Retinoblastoma is highly curable. But for many survivors, it has lifelong impacts. In 2019, our Alphabet of Hope shared survivor insights of #LifeBeyondRb. Rb Survivor and 2019 alphabet curator, Abby White, highlights 10 important messages from survivors about life beyond treatment and cure of childhood eye cancer.

The gold pin on a compass points to the word "survivorship"

7 Survivorship Tips and Tricks: navigating the adult post-retinoblastoma world

Diagnosis and treatment of eye cancer in early childhood is only the start of a lifelong story for many individuals affected by retinoblastoma. Marissa Gonzalez, Rb survivor and President of World Eye Cancer Hope USA, shares seven tips for being an active participant in your retinoblastoma survivorship journey.

If You Tell Them, They Will Know: raising awareness of retinoblastoma signs can save lives, eyes and sight.

Strabismus (turned eye) and leukocoria (white pupil) are the most common early signs of retinoblastoma.  Sandra Staffieri, Rb Care Co-ordinator at the Royal Children’s Hospital, Melbourne, explores why parent and healthcare provider awareness of these signs is vital to early diagnosis of childhood eye cancer.

Text above reads: "Speak Up" Image of an open book, its pages glowing gold and emitting sparks of light. Text below reads: "Share Your Retinoblastoma Story."

4 Key Ways Sharing Your Story Makes a Difference, and Tips for Telling

Every individual in the retinoblastoma community has a unique story to tell – whether parent, survivor, sibling, professional, extended family member or supporter. Abby White explores the importance of storytelling, and the many ways in which sharing your story can make a difference – to your own life, and to the world.

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When Survivors Grow Up: Family Experiences After Retinoblastoma

Retinoblastoma is highly curable, but lifelong impacts are significant for survivors, siblings, parents and extended family. After a particularly painful personal insight, Rb survivor and WE C Hope CEO Abby White asked families and survivors about their own experiences of life beyond childhood eye cancer care.

Close-up of a baby's face

How Do I Create A Family When I Have An RB1 Mutation?

Individuals who carry an RB1 mutation have a 50% chance of passing the retinoblastoma cancer syndrome on to each child.  Melissa Mills, bilateral retinoblastoma survivor and genetic counsellor, explores the psychological and physical impacts of this experience, and the different routes to creating a family when a prospective parent has an RB1 mutation..

An African doctor looks on as another uses a handheld digital camera to visualise a child's eyes during an exam under anaesthesia.

TNM Staging System for Retinoblastoma

Retinoblastoma is staged to help doctors describe the extent of cancer in a child’s body, define potential for cure, vision and eye salvage, identify the best treatments, and compare impact of different therapies. Dr. Ashwin Mallipatna explains the TNM Staging System for Retinoblastoma and why it is the best approach for patient care.

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Retinoblastoma Survivors’ Perspectives on Long-Term Follow up Care

Many retinoblastoma survivors live with significant long term treatment impacts and second cancer risks. Yet most children, adult survivors and their families struggle to access appropriate ongoing care. Len Burns, a totally blind bilateral Rb survivor and licensed family therapist, highlights the most common survivor concerns, and potential ways to improve long term care and quality of life.