Two photo panels side by side. On the left, a baby boy is seen with the left eye turning in towards his nose. On the right, a baby girl has a red reflex in her right eye, while her left eye shows a dull creamy-white reflex.

Eye of the Storm: the impact of ‘not knowing’ on mental health

Retinoblastoma Awareness Week promotes life and sight-saving early diagnosis. Sandra Staffieri, Rb Care Coordinator at the Royal Children’s Hospital Melbourne, highlights the importance of raising awareness among parents, caregivers, health professionals and survivors; and how lack of knowledge and delayed diagnosis can impact children, parents, and adults with second cancer risk.

A person's hands are seen typing on a laptop

Social Media Support: 10 Reasons Why Exchanging Medical Advice can be Unhelpful, and What to do Instead

When someone asks for support on social media, instincts drives us to offer hopeful solutions. But without full knowledge and understanding, we may cause more harm than help. Reviewing real interactions and their outcomes, WE C Hope CEO, Abby White, shares key points to consider when discussing retinoblastoma, and how to respond well.

A hand reaches through the screen of a laptop to hold the hand of the person standing in front of it. The person standing is reflected in the screen of the laptop.

Social Media Support: 7 Ways to Respond Effectively, and Why Our Responses Matter

How we respond to one another in retinoblastoma support forums, and the information we share, can significantly impact patient care and outcomes. Abby White shares 7 ways we can respond positively to any social media request for help, to improve communication, support, and best care for the child/survivor and family.

Flood: “Once you hear the sentence “your child has cancer” it is a constant flood till the end of treatment. It’s a flood of emotions, flood of information, flood of doubts, but in the middle of the flood you look at your child and you find the strength to keep your head out of water to survive.” Jackie, Mother of a Rb fighter. Image to the right shows a black and white photo taken underwater of a submerged woman wearing a long, white, sleeveless dress. Her face is above the waterline as her feet appear to be paddling and her arms extend to the sides.

Alphabet of Hope: Rewriting the Future of Retinoblastoma Care

After a year of publishing the #FamilyInSight Alphabet of Hope, we bring you the complete collection of 2020 Entries. This is the third #AlphabetOfHope. WE C Hope CEO, Abby White looks back at the alphabet’s genesis, and the insight, wisdom and motivation this literary project brings to the retinoblastoma community.

One Rb World 2020 Banner. Background shows the Ottawa skyline at sunset. Above the One Rb World logo, text reads: October 3-4, 2020, Ottawa, Canada (struckthrough text) | Virtual Conference. At the bottom of the image, text reads “Hosted By” followed by four logos of World Eye Cancer Hope, the Canadian Rb Society, Canadian Rb Research Advisory Board, and International Rb Consortium.

One Retinoblastoma World 2020: Inspiring Global Support, Research and Action.

In October, a diverse community of survivors, families and medical professionals came together at One Retinoblastoma World for two days of inspiring panels, research and calls to action.  WE C Hope USA President Marissa D. Gonzalez shares a recap of the fifth global conference, and her vision for next year’s event in Hawaii.

Enucleation, Life and Support: A Parent and Survivor Perspective

When a child has retinoblastoma, removing the affected eye remains the most common treatment worldwide to save life. Support is vital throughout treatment and long after. Lori and Grace Padilla share the perspective of a parent and a young adult survivor, their thoughts on enucleation, and the benefits of in-person support groups.

A boy wearing a hospital gown lies in hospital bed. He is attached to many monitors and tubes, smiling and giving a thumbs up.

10 Things Parents Want You to Know About Retinoblastoma

Caring for a child with retinoblastoma and healthy siblings is a complex journey for parents, from before diagnosis, through treatment, and beyond. Rb Mom and WE C Hope USA director, Lori Banos, shares 10 key messages parents have for health care professionals, fellow parents and the wider community.

A woman wearing a harness stands on a ship high above the waves. The setting sun and sail ropes are visible behind her.

10 Things Retinoblastoma Survivors Want You To Know

Retinoblastoma is highly curable. But for many survivors, it has lifelong impacts. In 2019, our Alphabet of Hope shared survivor insights of #LifeBeyondRb. Rb Survivor and 2019 alphabet curator, Abby White, highlights 10 important messages from survivors about life beyond treatment and cure of childhood eye cancer.

The gold pin on a compass points to the word "survivorship"

7 Survivorship Tips and Tricks: navigating the adult post-retinoblastoma world

Diagnosis and treatment of eye cancer in early childhood is only the start of a lifelong story for many individuals affected by retinoblastoma. Marissa Gonzalez, Rb survivor and President of World Eye Cancer Hope USA, shares seven tips for being an active participant in your retinoblastoma survivorship journey.

If You Tell Them, They Will Know: raising awareness of retinoblastoma signs can save lives, eyes and sight.

Strabismus (turned eye) and leukocoria (white pupil) are the most common early signs of retinoblastoma.  Sandra Staffieri, Rb Care Co-ordinator at the Royal Children’s Hospital, Melbourne, explores why parent and healthcare provider awareness of these signs is vital to early diagnosis of childhood eye cancer.