Tag Archive for: retinoblastoma treatment

A large, diverse group of people pose together in a conference room. Most are dressed in smart casual attire. Many are smiling and waving at the camera, and those in the centre are holding a large banner that reads "One Retinoblastoma World". A large world map features on the wall behind the group. At the front, two ladies sit close together holding a plush elephant with removable eye between them. The elephant is bedecked in red, white and blue flowers.

Laulima: Many Hands, One Retinoblastoma World

Laulima signifies the power of cooperation, teamwork and collective effort.  This Hawaiian concept of many hands striving together drives the One Rb World conference, taking place in Honolulu this October.  Members of our 2024 conference team explain how laulima inspires their work for this global community, united to advance retinoblastoma care for all.

Side-by-side photos of two young girls with a text overlay. On the left, a smiling Caucasian girl with wispy light brown hair, wearing a floral dress, holds a bouquet of daisies. She is outdoors, bathed in sunlight. On the right, a smiling African girl with short black hair relaxes on a colourful plaid sofa. She is wearing a pink top with a ruffled neckline, and rests her cheek on her hand. Across the top, in cursive script, text reads "Daisy Gave Rati Hope".

From One Child to One Rb World: Our Foundation Story

Daisy’s Eye Cancer Fund (now World Eye Cancer Hope) evolved from the generosity of one family sharing hope with another at opposite ends of the earth, creating light within the darkness that retinoblastoma brought to their lives. Rb Survivor and Daisy Fund co-founder, Abby White, shares Rati’s story, and how her experience led to our hope-building work today.

A large group of people gather together for a group photo. Some are wearing beaded t-shirts showing the Daisy Fund logo.

From One Child to One Rb World: WE C Hope for Retinoblastoma Care

In the first half of this article, we met Rati and Daisy, two young children with retinoblastoma who inspired the foundation of Daisy’s Eye Cancer Fund in 2004. In part 2, Rb Survivor and Daisy Fund co-founder, Abby White, reflects on what happened after Rati died – our journey to World Eye Cancer Hope (WE C Hope), One Rb World, and advocacy for all children, survivors and families.

A collage of 8 small photos, showing buildings and people doing various activities, all bathed in green, pink, blue or purple light. Along the bottom, a banner reads "RARE DISEASE DAY GLOBAL CHAIN OF LIGHTS" and “hashtag LIGHT UP FOR RARE", written in blue, green and pink. The event logo features handprints in the three colours, overlapping to form a fan around a white silhouette of a person from waist-up, and additional colours where they overlap.

Light Up for Rare and Share Your Retinoblastoma Colours on February 29!

Retinoblastoma is a rare cancer, affecting around 1 in 16,000 live births.  Rarity poses challenges from pre-diagnosis through treatment and lifelong care – Rare Disease Day matters to our community!  Discover how you can glow bright on the evening of February 29 to help form a Global Chain of Light for everyone living with rare childhood eye cancer and its effects.

Two women are seated at a round table in a conference room, directly facing each other as they engage in deep discussion. The woman on the left clasps her hands on her lap and looks highly focused. The woman on the right gesticulates with both hands raised to chest level, palms facing towards the other woman, with her fingers splayed. She appears to be explaining or emphasizing a point, or trying to convey information clearly. A tablet and notepad rest on the table between the two ladies.

Capture the Moment at One Retinoblastoma World 2024 in Hawaii

One Retinoblastoma World is community, conversation and collaboration for the best lifelong Rb care and support.  Previous participants share why the event is so valuable.  Rb survivor and WE C Hope CEO, Abby White, considers the many benefits of participating in person compared to attending online, and some ways we can travel “kuleana” to the conference.

Close-up photo of a young toddler with a blue and white pacifier in their mouth, looking directly at the camera. The right side of the child’s face is bathed in light while the left side is in shadow. The pupil of the right eye has a prominent pearly glow. The blurred background emphasizes the child's face. Overlaying the background, bold white text states "An early diagnosis is the best cure." The word “Cure” is emphasised in a flowing gold script.

Early Diagnosis is the Bedrock of Retinoblastoma Care

Despite advances in retinoblastoma treatment, effective care is challenged globally by delayed diagnosis. Early diagnosis saves lives and improves sight-saving options. Rb survivor and WE C Hope CEO, Abby White, explores common reasons for delayed diagnosis, four pillars needed to achieve routine early diagnosis, and how our One Rb World community is united in this goal.

Four ladies in party dress stand in front of a royal blue backdrop with a sign in bright turquoise blue and magenta that says Hope Without Boundaries.

Beyond Borders: Retinoblastoma in Africa and the Pacific

We recap a highly successful first conference in Africa for the International Society of Ocular Oncology, and look forward to One Retinoblastoma World 2024 in Honolulu, Hawaii. With One Rb World meeting co-chairs Dr. Jesse L. Berry, Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, USA; Sandra E. Staffieri PhD, Royal Children’s Hospital Melbourne, Australia; and Marissa D. Gonzalez, World Eye Cancer Hope USA.

An illustration of a syringe holding medicine. The syringe casts a long shadow in the shape of a dollar symbol.

Investing in Hope: The Quest to Fund Retinoblastoma Research

Research funding is vital to improve retinoblastoma early diagnosis, life and sight-saving treatment, family support, survivor care, and cancer prevention. But securing the funds for rare cancer research is very tough, often demoralising for researchers and clinician-scientists. Three retinoblastoma researchers share their experience, and two organizations helping to drive Rb research forward invite you to help.

A group of people representing diverse ethnic backgrounds are sitting or standing around a table scattered with post-it notes. They are deep in conversation, and several are reaching out to move post-it notes into new positions on the table.

United Against Retinoblastoma: The Importance of Global Data and Collaboration

Understanding how retinoblastoma affects children is critical to improve diagnosis, treatment, support and outcomes for all.  Mattan Arazi, M.D and Ido Didi Fabian, M.D., MPH, world-focused ophthalmologists from Sheba Medical Centre, Israel, explore why global data and collaboration are so important in Rb research, and the knowledge, progress, and hope they are building for families and professional teams worldwide.

The silhouette of a medical caduceus symbol features two snakes winding around a winged staff. A weighing dish hangs from each wing. The scales are in balance.

Unveiling Shadows: Cognitive and Unconscious Bias in Retinoblastoma Research

The human mind can subtly influence scientific research, with potentially serious consequences for patient care and outcomes. Rb survivor and WE C Hope CEO, Abby White, explores the nuanced world of cognitive and unconscious biases in retinoblastoma research, and strategies that can minimize their impact to ensure objective research and the best care possible for all.