An individual without information cannot take responsibility. An individual with information can't help but take responsibility.

DIY Guide to Assess Medical Information and Research (Part 1)

Beautiful Rati During Treatment.

In Her Memory…

11 years ago, a new baby girl was born in Botswana. Four short years later, retinoblastoma claimed her life. Her name means love, and today, her legacy continues to build hope for other children around the world.

Childhood Cancer Day Awareness Flyer, a partnership of the International Confederation of Childhood Cancer Parent Organisations (ICCCPO) and the International Society of Paediatric Oncology (SIOP).

Are You Child Cancer Aware?

The earlier cancer is diagnosed, the easier it is to treat, often requiring less intense therapy and fewer invasive procedures that have lower cost physically, emotionally and financially. Awareness of childhood cancer is key to achieving early diagnosis, saving lives and limiting the burden of cancer treatment on the child, family and wider society.

RbCoLab pathology scanner

Grand Challenges: Life Saving Cancer Pathology in Africa

Our Global Rb Scientist, Dr. Helen Dimaras, is leading a major initiative to advance digital pathology consultations at our pathology Lab in Nairobi, thanks to a $100,000 grant from Grand Challenges Canada. The digital RbCoLab will significantly improve care for each child by rapidly identifying their true risk and need for further treatment after their eye has been removed.

Celebrating a successful week of training in Eldoret.

Child Life: Training for Best Care

Our child life leaders are excited to be bringing child life skills to the children they care for. Their knowledge, vision and dedication will enrich paediatric health care and children’s lives beyond measure.

Any child can be a princess (or prince) even after their eye is removed.

Why Refuse Eye Removal Surgery?

People often ask me incredulously “why would parents refuse eye removed surgery if it’s the only way to save their child’s life?” This is a very important question. Understanding the complex answers helps us care for families to ensure children have the best chance of cure.

An overwhelmed mother comforts her child in hospital.

Two Children – Two Very Different Journeys.

Two children. The same affliction. Drastically different outcomes. Yet each story represents the most common reality for children with retinoblastoma in these respective parts of the world.