Tag Archive for: child life

A female doctor wearing green scrubs, surgical mask, and a brightly coloured scrub cap, sits on a play area with a child patient. She has placed her stethoscope on the child’s doll. The child is facing the doctor, mostly out of frame, and is using a toy stethoscope to mirror the doctor’s actions.

10 Child Life Tips for Clinicians

Medical appointments, procedures, and treatments are potentially stressful for children and their families, at all stages of their retinoblastoma experience. Child life specialist Morgan Livingstone shares 10 simple ways all medical professionals can ease stress and anxiety, support healthy coping, and help children and families thrive throughout simple interactions and complex cancer care.

A fuzzy, brown teddy bear sits on a table with a blue table cloth. The bear has red and black plaid feet, a cream snout, black eyes, a brown nose, and a black smile. A nasograstric tube and a gastrostomy tube are inserted, and an IV pole and IV fluids are seen to the side. Behind the bear is a teddy bear sized hospital bed and a green curtain.

Play – The Key Ingredient to Pediatric Medical Care

Play is the language, university, and business of childhood. Medical play is a key part of child-focused health care, helping young patients learn, reduce fear, and take part in their care. Sophie Goldberg, child life intern and student of Child Life and Pediatric Psychosocial Care, explores what medical play is, and how you can use it to empower your child through their medical experiences.

Three young girls stand together on a lawn, against a backdrop of lush foliage.

How to Support Siblings Receiving Retinoblastoma Screening

Medical appointments, assessments and tests are potentially stressful for anyone, at any age. Cancer screening can be especially difficult if the one being screened is the young sibling of a child diagnosed with retinoblastoma. Child life specialist Morgan Livingstone explores why siblings need cancer screening, and how to help them understand and cope with their medical experience.

A young girl with a dressing over one eye sits on her mother's lap, while a medical professional crouches so his face is level with hers. He offers his open hands to her, palms up. All three people are African.

How to Advocate for Child Life Support in Your Child’s Medical Care

Parenting children through retinoblastoma is tough.  Being their chief advocate is one of your most important roles throughout their cancer experience.  Rb Survivor and WE C Hope CEO, Abby White, discusses why parents and caregivers should advocate for child life support, how to ask for child life services, and how to work effectively with child life professionals for the best outcomes.

A school-age girl looks towards the camera with wide eyes and a sad expression. She has long black hair and wears a pink top. In the background, slightly out of focus, two children sitting next to one another look towards the girl, their heads bent towards one another in conversation.

“But You’re My Friend……”: How to Spot and Deal With a Bullying Friend.

Friendships are a huge part of our lives; they bring us so much joy, comfort, motivation, and hope. But our friends can also hurt us and make us feel sad – friends can even be bullies.  What exactly is “Friendship Bullying”?  How do you identify it, stop it, and heal from the pain?  Morgan Livingstone CCLS has written this blog for our young friends who may be experiencing bullying behavior from a friend or group of friends.

Young patients put a brannula in the arm of a medical play puppet. They are wearing surgical gloves.

Child Life in Kenya: The Sally Test Child Life Program

Children with cancer experience invasive procedures and stressful events throughout their medical care that can impact their ability to cope, inhibit their development and negatively affect their health and well-being throughout life. Child life supports effective healthcare and reduces trauma. Morgan Livingstone CCLS describes how WE C Hope is bringing hope through Child Life to children and their families in Africa.

A mother and young child face one another oon couch while talking.

How To Support Siblings of Children With Retinoblastoma

Siblings of children with retinoblastoma often experience big fears, worries and emotions when their brother or sister is first diagnosed, during treatment, and beyond. Early Years Educator and Child Life Intern Keanna Gordon explores childhood eye cancer from the sibling’s perspective, and how parents can best support their wellbeing.

A child life specialist blows bubbles through an anesthesia mask towards a little girl

Child Life in Retinoblastoma Care

Child life can profoundly impact a child’s experience of retinoblastoma, and their quality of life. However, many children treated at specialist retinoblastoma centres lack child life support, and their parents feel unsupported, compared with other cancer patients. Abby White explores the challenges and ways to overcome them.

A bald female toddler sits on her mother’s lap during a port access procedure. Her back rests against her mother’s chest, and her head is turned up and back towards her mother, who is leaning down in conversation. Both mother and child are white. The nurse accessing the port is seen from behind and has fair hair.

Questions About COVID-19 and Retinoblastoma

People around the world are feeling anxious about the coronavirus pandemic. We understand the concern is especially acute for parents of children with retinoblastoma, and survivors who have chronic health conditions and second cancer diagnosis. Here we answer questions we have received about the virus.

A female adult plays patient, cared for by a group of children dressed in medical outfits. She wears an eye patch on her left eye, and the children put bandaids on her arms. One of the children is wearing an anaesthetic mask.

Child Life Programs: Play With Purpose at Retinoblastoma Gatherings

Eye cancer is a potentially overwhelming experience for young children, whether patient or sibling. Child life can radically improve care and life for the entire family, but too many children lack access to this specialist support. Abby White shares how WE C Hope supported Child Life programs are helping to change that.