Tag Archive for: Christmas for all

A high doorway is framed by two Christmas trees, each standing about 10ft tall. They are exquisitely decorated with hundreds of gold lights, pink glass roses, and other ornaments that reflect and refract the light. A large banqueting table is set up in the centre, surrounded by high back red velvet chairs that contrast beautifully against the glittering gold candelabras. Gold crackers and sparkling goblets at each place setting hint at the anticipated party. Along the centre of the table, intricate models in cream, glitter and gold show scenes from the story of Cinderella. On the left of frame is the glittering expanse of a fairy-tale castle. To the right, two ladies gesture and watch the pumpkin carriage racing away over a bridge. Further right, Prince Charming stands below a clock tower as the hands point to midnight, and Cinderella races away down a flight of stairs, a single glittering slipper lost behind her. Almost off-frame, a chair is pictured, in which someone is sitting to try on a shoe. The overall setup is glittering splendour. The high doorway, significantly higher ceiling, very large, tall trees, and several statues between them, give the impression of a grand, spacious room out-of-frame.

12 Ways to Inclusive Festive Fun: How to Celebrate the Holidays with Your Child Who Is Blind or Visually Impaired – Part 2

The glorious visual spectacle of this Holiday Season can exclude and isolate a child with vision loss from retinoblastoma, but we can experience these traditions with all our senses. In part 2 of this festive blog, bilateral Rb Survivor, Abby White, shares six more ways to include blind and visually impaired children in Holiday traditions, creating delight for the whole family.

Six soft jute cloth bags in colours of earthy red, green, and gold sit in a row. They showcase two displaying kinds of tactile embellishment. On 3 bags, carved wooden tags shaped like a gingerbread man, Christmas tree and star clearly display the dates as raised tactile numbers. On the other three, foam stickers shaped like a tree, love heart and stocking, the numbers are large tactile cut-outs.

12 Ways to Inclusive Festive Fun: How to Celebrate the Holidays with Your Child Who Is Blind or Visually Impaired – Part 1

When a child has vision loss from retinoblastoma, highly visual aspects of this Holiday Season can be challenging, exclusionary and isolating. But a little thought and creative adaptation can completely change the experience. In part 1 of this 2-part blog, bilateral Rb Survivor, Abby White, shares 12 ways to include blind and visually impaired children in traditional Holiday activities.