Tag Archive for: retinoblastoma

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Remembering Dr. A Linn Murphree

With a heavy heart, we share the news that Dr. A Linn Murphree, Professor of Ophthalmology, Founder of the Vision Center, and Director of the Retinoblastoma Program at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles and USC, passed peacefully on March 9th, 2022. Linn was a tremendous force in ocular oncology, advancing knowledge of the RB1 gene, and care for children with retinoblastoma.

A young girl with a dressing over one eye sits on her mother's lap, while a medical professional crouches so his face is level with hers. He offers his open hands to her, palms up. All three people are African.

How to Advocate for Child Life Support in Your Child’s Medical Care

Parenting children through retinoblastoma is tough.  Being their chief advocate is one of your most important roles throughout their cancer experience.  Rb Survivor and WE C Hope CEO, Abby White, discusses why parents and caregivers should advocate for child life support, how to ask for child life services, and how to work effectively with child life professionals for the best outcomes.

Leslie sitting in a rocking chair at the hospital, holding 7 month old Thomas, Mason and Luke. Thomas is dressed in a blue and white striped outfit, wearing a blue eye patch on his right eye, Mason is dressed in green hospital scrubs with an IV that is out-of-frame. Luke is also dressed in a blue and white outfit. All the boys are alert with wide open eyes and partial smiles. Leslie's lap is quite full.

Triplets with Cancer: Surviving and Thriving Through the Unexpected

A retinoblastoma diagnosis is shocking for parents, and the journey through complex specialist care can be highly stressful. RB1 genetics mean this cancer often affects more than one child in a family. Leslie Low shares her experience of caring for her triplets – all diagnosed with cancer in both eyes, and the things that helped her family cope; physically, psychologically, and practically.

A high doorway is framed by two Christmas trees, each standing about 10ft tall. They are exquisitely decorated with hundreds of gold lights, pink glass roses, and other ornaments that reflect and refract the light. A large banqueting table is set up in the centre, surrounded by high back red velvet chairs that contrast beautifully against the glittering gold candelabras. Gold crackers and sparkling goblets at each place setting hint at the anticipated party. Along the centre of the table, intricate models in cream, glitter and gold show scenes from the story of Cinderella. On the left of frame is the glittering expanse of a fairy-tale castle. To the right, two ladies gesture and watch the pumpkin carriage racing away over a bridge. Further right, Prince Charming stands below a clock tower as the hands point to midnight, and Cinderella races away down a flight of stairs, a single glittering slipper lost behind her. Almost off-frame, a chair is pictured, in which someone is sitting to try on a shoe. The overall setup is glittering splendour. The high doorway, significantly higher ceiling, very large, tall trees, and several statues between them, give the impression of a grand, spacious room out-of-frame.

12 Ways to Inclusive Festive Fun: How to Celebrate the Holidays with Your Child Who Is Blind or Visually Impaired – Part 2

The glorious visual spectacle of this Holiday Season can exclude and isolate a child with vision loss from retinoblastoma, but we can experience these traditions with all our senses. In part 2 of this festive blog, bilateral Rb Survivor, Abby White, shares six more ways to include blind and visually impaired children in Holiday traditions, creating delight for the whole family.

Six soft jute cloth bags in colours of earthy red, green, and gold sit in a row. They showcase two displaying kinds of tactile embellishment. On 3 bags, carved wooden tags shaped like a gingerbread man, Christmas tree and star clearly display the dates as raised tactile numbers. On the other three, foam stickers shaped like a tree, love heart and stocking, the numbers are large tactile cut-outs.

12 Ways to Inclusive Festive Fun: How to Celebrate the Holidays with Your Child Who Is Blind or Visually Impaired – Part 1

When a child has vision loss from retinoblastoma, highly visual aspects of this Holiday Season can be challenging, exclusionary and isolating. But a little thought and creative adaptation can completely change the experience. In part 1 of this 2-part blog, bilateral Rb Survivor, Abby White, shares 12 ways to include blind and visually impaired children in traditional Holiday activities.

A school-age girl looks towards the camera with wide eyes and a sad expression. She has long black hair and wears a pink top. In the background, slightly out of focus, two children sitting next to one another look towards the girl, their heads bent towards one another in conversation.

“But You’re My Friend……”: How to Spot and Deal With a Bullying Friend.

Friendships are a huge part of our lives; they bring us so much joy, comfort, motivation, and hope. But our friends can also hurt us and make us feel sad – friends can even be bullies.  What exactly is “Friendship Bullying”?  How do you identify it, stop it, and heal from the pain?  Morgan Livingstone CCLS has written this blog for our young friends who may be experiencing bullying behavior from a friend or group of friends.

A slide from Sarah’s presentation, titled “Thank You”, with a single photo and the One Rb World 2021 Logo below. In the photo, Sarah sits on a rock structure at the top of a mountain. Her body is facing to the left, her legs outstretched, and her feet resting on a different rock. She is leaning against the rock she is seated on, looking away from the camera at the view. Slivers of blue sky peak through the blanket of clouds, and in the distance, many trees, farms, fields and national parkland can be seen from this high vantage point.

One Rb World 2021: Planning, Creating, Sharing and Raising Hope Together

On 1-3 October, we hosted a hope-filled One Rb World 2021 meeting. Planning and hosting is always an adventure, and the 6th One Rb World was especially so! Co-Chairs, Dr. Sandra Staffieri PhD, Rb Care Co-Ordinator, Royal Children’s Hospital, Melbourne, Australia, and Marissa Gonzalez, Bilateral Rb Survivor and President, World Eye Cancer Hope USA, share behind-the-scenes insight and conference highlights.

The book When sadness is at your door by Eva Eland sits on a child’s lap as they hold it. The book is opened to a page showing an illustration of a child standing on a tree stump hugging a blue shadow that is their sadness. The text on the page reads “Maybe all it wants to know is that it is welcome”.

How to Help Your Child Work Through BIG Emotions

Young children are often overwhelmed by big emotions in the natural process of their development. When they face ongoing stressors like cancer or a pandemic, giving them support, tools and skills to learn about and work through their emotions is critical. Child life specialist Rebekah Reimer provides some practical guidance to help.

Promotional card in tropical colours. Text reads: "One Retinoblastoma World. Virtual Conference, October 1-3. A global conference for eye and cancer specialists, researchers, parents, and survivors. Register Today!” www.wechope.org/onerbworld

Register Now for One Retinoblastoma World 2021 – Sharing Ideas, Opportunities and Friendship

As the 6th One Retinoblastoma World Conference fast approaches, this year’s organizers Sandra Staffieri and Marissa Gonzalez, together with Megan Webber, are excited to share an update. They give an overview of the program, highlighting some of the sessions and goals, and the need for global discussion and collaboration involving all stakeholders.

A family stand together on an open landscape, facing away from the camera. The mother holds a young child in one arm while her other arm is wrapped around her husband’s waist. The father holds the other child aloft on his shoulders, their hands clasped and outstretched. The sky and landscape ahead is indiscernible due to the intensity of light. The brightest beam is seen through the window formed by the father and child and their clasped hands.

Deciding to Conceive with Heritable Retinoblastoma

When children may inherit retinoblastoma, deciding how to start a family awakens new feelings in survivors. Every possible option comes with complex questions and emotional costs, and survivors and their partners may experience feelings of isolation as they navigate their decisions. Rb survivor Ruth Greenslade shares her reasons for deciding to have children, and her personal perspective of factors to consider when conceiving with heritable Rb.