We Are One artwork: Centre text panel surrounted by B&W images of singing children. Text reads "Child4Child by Childhood Cancer International"

“We Are One” Against Childhood Cancer, Sing 1M+ Children!

Frozen composer Christophe Beck and 1M+ children making more than 900,000 videos, have created the childhood cancer awareness song We Are One. Find out more and watch the music video.

Child4Child by Childhood Cancer International - text above a partial image of a globe covered in glowing lights to show the location of participating chikdren.

Global Cancer Awareness Campaigns

February 4 is World Cancer Day. February 15 is International Childhood Cancer Day. Children and adults worldwide can two creative campaigns, raising awareness and showing support for those fighting cancer today. Kids can join the chorus of a new single to be released on Feb 15. Anyone can join the WCD Talking Hands campaign.

Child4Child by Childhood Cancer International - text above a partial image of a globe covered in glowing lights to show the location of participating chikdren.

Child4Child – Young Singers Worldwide Unite For New Childhood Cancer Single

Child4Child invites the world’s children join in the chorus of a new song created by Disney’s Frozen Composer, Christophe Beck. Performed by some of YouTube’s top singing kids, “We Are One” will be released on International Childhood Cancer Day, February 15, including the voices of children from around the world.

The message “Happy New Year 2016” written in gold text, laid over a graduated gold background decorated with gold stars.

Happy New Year!

I expect, like me, many of you woke up today with resolutions and big plans to achieve them. As one of my own New Year resolutions is to maintain this blog regularly, I thought sharing some tips I’ve found helpful would be a great way to begin. I’ll be using them to stay on track with my goal, and I hope they’ll help turn your own New Year Resolutions into goals you can truly accomplish in 2016!

WE C Hope for All Children, Survivors and Their Families!


Monday August 3, 2015 | Abby White, WE C Hope CEO


We have some exciting news to share with you, and we hope you will be excited too!

On 1st September, Daisy’s Eye Cancer Fund will be rebranding.  We’ll have a new name, bright bold logo and a new home on the internet.

Why Are We Rebranding?

In 2012, our international team began discussing the possible need to rebrand.  There were a number of reasons for this.

  • Our logo, while beautifully bright and distinctive, was irrelevant to most children in the world because most children do not have blue eyes.
  • Our logo also did not reflect the significance of red eye reflex and “white pupil” as the most common early sign of eye cancer in children.
  • “Daisy”, the name, suggested a focus on one child called Daisy, creating confusion, especially when we began working in the USA where there are many funds named for individual children and fundraising for their important individual needs.
  • The apostrophe (Daisy’s) caused confusion in communicating the name and coding for social media and search engine optimization.
  • “Fund” implies we have significant resources from which to give grants to individuals.  We receive many requests for funding of treatment, particularly from families in the developing world and USA.  Unfortunately, we are unable to support individual families financially as we must focus our small funds on programs that will bring change to benefit many children, survivors and their families.

So after many long discussions, we took the momentous decision to rebrand.  This has been a long journey with a lot of work, not least because there are four countries involved in the process!  The experience has been a testament to the collaboration and co-operation between our teams in Canada, Kenya, the UK and USA.

We are finally ready to share our momentous news with our friends and supporters.

Daisy’s Gift Set Us on an Incredible Journey

We haDaisyve so much to thank Daisy for.  She has experienced so much in her young life, and given so much of herself to others.  In 2004, not long after cancer claimed her second eye, her family gave the most generous gift to a child they’d never met who lived at the other end of the world.  They donated money from the fund they’d set up for Daisy, to help save the life of two-year-old Rati from Botswana.

RatiThat beautiful gesture led to the birth of Daisy’s Eye Cancer Fund, initially fundraising just for Rati’s care, but rapidly growing to help many more children.  Expert care sadly came too late for Rati, and there were so many opportunities to save her life in Africa that were missed.  Daisy’s Eye Cancer Fund began to focus on addressing these challenges that cause so many children to suffer before they reach specialist care.

We have grown up so much in the last 10 years, always led by the children.  We have a world focus and so much hope of better care for all those affected by retinoblastoma in both developing and developed countries.  While the decision has been hard to make the change, the time is right.  We know it will bring many blessings to those we help.  Daisy and Rati will always, always be cherished at the heart of who we are and what we do.

The Big Change

From 1st September, our organization will be called World Eye Cancer Hope, WE C Hope for short. Our vision (life and sight for every child) remains unchanged.  Our mission will also continue as always – educating for early diagnosis, empowering evidence based medical care for all and enabling effective family support for all.

Our new website will continue to provide a comprehensive Retinoblastoma Resource for families, survivors and all who care for them or have an interest in childhood eye cancer.

Our social media presences should continue as normal without any disruption to our friends and followers.  Once we’re changed over, you’ll probably notice much more interaction with our social media communities, and we look forward to that very much.

We have more exciting news to share with you, particularly from our friends in Kenya – wonderful progress not just for children with retinoblastoma, but for all children with cancer in the country…we’re looking forward very much to sharing that news with you, but thought we’d do one exciting news report at a time!!

Leukocoria - white eye reflexWe’ll introduce you to the World Eye Cancer Hope logo on September 1. It’s simple, bright and very clearly tells of red reflex and the white reflex early sign of retinoblastoma that can be seen in flash photos when red-eye reduction is not used (see left) and dim light.  We look forward to sharing it with you and hearing what you think!

WE C Hope! Please join us on September 1 as we begin a new chapter in the story of building effective care for all children with eye cancer, survivors and families.

WE C Hope

WE C Hope for today.
Small gestures of love to carry us through.
Space to breathe deep and our spirits renew.
Your comfort and peace and happiness too.

WE C Hope for tomorrow.
To hear the words “stable” or “cancer free”
No more treatments – just letting you Be.
Cherishing each day as a family.

WE C Hope for the future.
Systematic education so all are aware.
Global teamwork to improve medical care.
Families united against this cancer so rare.

WE C Hope for all families.
No more innocent faces defiled.
Action that reaches around the world.
Promising life and sight for every child.

Abby White

Our Stories – Abby

Becky Matthew

Our Stories: Becky Matthew

Quote: "Two roads diverged in a wood and I took the one less traveled by, and that has made all the difference." Robert Frost

A Rough Road Through The Valley

So many days I feel I am banging my head against a wall, watching children die who could have been saved with clear information, simple surgery and emotional support. But the knowledge of how life could be made better for each child, family and survivor is a strong motivational pull. The suffering that can be mitigated with relatively small resources. Somehow when I think I have no more energy, I mine a new seam from within, and from the encouragement and kindness of others, and I move forward, one step at a time.

A baby has one red pupil and one white pupul - the classic early sign of eye cancer in children.

PhotoRED: Know the Glow and Check for Normal Red Eye Reflex in Children.

Taking photographs to check for red eye reflex is one of the best ways parents can detect early signs of serious eye disease in young children. Here we explain red eye photography and the simple technique all parents should know to check for healthy red reflex in children.